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3 Tips on Measuring Page Performance

See Gartner’s latest research on the application performance monitoring landscape and how APM suites are becoming more and more critical to the business, brought to you in partnership with AppDynamics.

Web pages today are becoming increasingly complex and it is now well recognized that simply measuring page load time does not represent the  response time of a page.

But what exactly do we mean by response time? Terms such as time to interactivity, perceived performance, above the fold performance etc. have come into vogue. Let’s examine these in turn.

Time To Interactivity

In last year’s Velocity Conference, Nicholas Zakas of Yahoo! gave an excellent presentation on how the Yahoo! Front Page responsiveness was improved in which he focused on time to interactivity. In other words, when can a user actually interact with a page (say click on a link) is more important than ensuring that the entire page gets rendered. With pages increasingly containing animated multi-media content which the user may not care about, this definition may make sense. However,  imagine a page whose primary purpose is to serve up links to other pages (e.g. news) and loads lots of images after onload. All the links appear first which means the user can interact with the site, yet the page has lots of white space where the images go – can we truly just measure the time to interactivity and claim this to be the response time of a page?

Perceived Performance

Another popular term, perceived performance is defined loosely as the time that the user perceives it takes for the page. This means that all the major elements of the page that the user can easily see must  be rendered. By definition, this measurement is highly subjective. Perceptions differ – for e.g. one user may not miss the Chat pane in gmail while for another this is a very important feature. Further, again by definition, this metric is application dependent. Nevertheless, for a particular web application, it is possible for developers and performance engineers to agree on a definition of what is perceived performance and work towards measuring/improving it.

Above The Fold Performance

In the Velocity Online conference last week, Jake Brutlag of google proposed  “Above the Fold Time” (AFT) as a method of measuring a more meaningful response time. This was defined as the time taken to render all of the static elements in the visible portion of the browser window. Jake and others have put in some serious thought and defined the algorithm to distinguish between the static and dynamic (e.g. ads) content on a page.

Clearly, one part of the AFT proposal is valid -  one doesn’t really care about the content on the page that is not visible initially and which the user can only get to by scrolling. But measuring everything above the fold has its issues as well. Take for instance the new Yahoo! Mail Beta. Y! Mail now has extensive social features to enable one to connect to Facebook, Twitter, Messenger and endless third-party applications. It is arguable whether the user will expect all of these third-party links to be on the page before he “perceives” that his request is complete.  The page still looks finished without those links.

In my opinion, we need to distinguish between the essential parts of the page vs the optional ones (A caveat here – although no one would argue that an ad is essential, it is essential for the page to look complete).  Looking at just static vs dynamic pixels misses this point. The difficulty of course is that there is no uniform way to define what is essential – it once again becomes application/page specific.

But for now, that’s the way I am going – defining “perceived performance” on a case by case basis.

The Performance Zone is brought to you in partnership with AppDynamics.  See Gartner’s latest research on the application performance monitoring landscape and how APM suites are becoming more and more critical to the business.


Published at DZone with permission of Shanti Subramanyam, DZone MVB. See the original article here.

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