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Always Assume That You're the Problem

If you are as much of a fan of the book “The Pragmatic Programmer” as I am, then you might remember the phase:

“Select” Isn’t Broken

You can find this nugget, along with others, on pragmatic press’ site. In the book though they go in further detail to lay out a story where a programmer was convinced that he had found a bug in the “select” Solaris API call. Obviously after wasted time, hilariousness, and much chicanery, the programmer was forced to analyze the problem and discovered that, alas, it was in his own code.

If this sounds familiar to you, then shame on you, but you may be sitting there saying “Pssssshhhhhaaaaaa, I always assume that my code is the problem. And then I fix that junk and release some killer builds.” And if you are saying that, then why are you speaking like that? But seriously, I applaud you for being so humble. It is good to look at your own work with a cautious eye, and sometimes it can keep you from getting seriously embarrassed.

Read the rest of this post at CodeThinked.com

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