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Answer: Stopping the leaks

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Answer: Stopping the leaks

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Yesterday I posted the following challenge:

Given the following API, can you think of a way that would prevent memory leaks?

public interface IBufferPool
{
    byte[] TakeBuffer(int size);
    void ReturnBuffer(byte[] buffer);
}

The problem with having something like this is that forgetting to return the buffer is going to cause a memory leak. Instead of having that I would like to have the application stop if a buffer is leaked. Leaked means that no one is referencing this buffer but it wasn’t returned to the pool.

What I would really like is that when running in debug mode, leaking a buffer would stop the entire application and tell me:

  • That a buffer was leaked.
  • What was the stack trace that allocated that buffer.

Let us take a look at how we are going about implementing this, shall we? I am going to defer the actual implementation of the buffer pool to System.ServiceModel.Channels.BufferManager and focus on providing the anti leak features. The result is that this code:

IBufferPool pool = new BufferPool(1024*512, 1024);

var buffer = pool.TakeBuffer(512);
GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers(); // nothing here

pool.ReturnBuffer(buffer);
buffer = null;
GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers(); // nothing here, we released the memory properly

pool.TakeBuffer(512); // take and discard a buffer without returning to the pool
GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers(); // failure!

Will result in the following error:

Unhandled Exception: System.InvalidOperationException: A buffer was leaked. Initial allocation:
   at ConsoleApplication1.BufferPool.BufferTracker.TrackAllocation() in IBufferPool.cs:line 22
   at ConsoleApplication1.BufferPool.TakeBuffer(Int32 size) in IBufferPool.cs:line 60
   at ConsoleApplication1.Program.Main(String[] args) in Program.cs:line 21

And now for the implementation:

public class BufferPool : IBufferPool
{
    public class BufferTracker
    {
        private StackTrace stackTrace;

        public void TrackAllocation()
        {
            stackTrace = new StackTrace(true);
            GC.ReRegisterForFinalize(this);
        }

        public void Discard()
        {
            stackTrace = null;
            GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
        }

        ~BufferTracker()
        {
            if (stackTrace == null)
                return;

            throw new InvalidOperationException(
                "A buffer was leaked. Initial allocation:" + Environment.NewLine + stackTrace
                );
        }
    }

    private readonly BufferManager bufferManager;
    private ConditionalWeakTable<byte[], BufferTracker> trackLeakedBuffers = new ConditionalWeakTable<byte[], BufferTracker>();

    public BufferPool(long maxBufferPoolSize, int maxBufferSize)
    {
        bufferManager = BufferManager.CreateBufferManager(maxBufferPoolSize, maxBufferSize);
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        bufferManager.Clear();
        // note that disposing the pool before returning all of the buffers will cause a crash
    }

    public byte[] TakeBuffer(int size)
    {
        var buffer = bufferManager.TakeBuffer(size);
        trackLeakedBuffers.GetOrCreateValue(buffer).TrackAllocation();
        return buffer;
    }

    public void ReturnBuffer(byte[] buffer)
    {
        BufferTracker value;
        if(trackLeakedBuffers.TryGetValue(buffer, out value))
        {
            value.Discard();
        }
        bufferManager.ReturnBuffer(buffer);
    }
}

As you can see, utilizing ConditionalWeakTable is quite powerful, since it allows us to support a lot of really advanced scenarios in a fairly simple ways.

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Published at DZone with permission of Oren Eini, DZone MVB. See the original article here.

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