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ASP.NET Web API and Razor To Go Fully Open Source

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ASP.NET Web API and Razor To Go Fully Open Source

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Scott Guthrie has let the word out about some exciting news coming out of Microsoft. Since Version 1, ASP.NET MVC has been available under an open source license. Microsoft has also integrated a bunch of great open source technologies into their product, including jQuery, NuGet, Knockout.js, and more. Today, the folks at Redmond announced that they will also release the source code for ASP.NET Web API and Razor (ASP.NET Web Pages) under an even more popular open source license, Apache 2.0. To sweeten the pot, they're even going to help increase transparency by hosting their code repositories on CodePlex! This news is exciting because it means that members of the comunity can provude their feedback on bug-fixes, feature development, and more. They'll also have constant access to the most up-to-date code.

Further showing that they're open to feedback, Microsoft also announced that developers outside of Microsoft will also be able to, for the first time, submit code and patch ideas that the company can look over and decide if they want to include in future updates. This open development model was implemented in December for Windows Azure SDK, and the results have been promising on both ends.

This tighter feedback loop could be a boon to developers and lead to a rise in innovation in ASP.NET. How happy does this make you as a developer?

More more info, check out Scott Hanselman's blog post!

Update: Miguel de Icaza, the creator of the Mono framework, was the first third party developer to submit code for review. Will you be next?

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Published at DZone with permission of Prasant Lokinendi. See the original article here.

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