Over a million developers have joined DZone.

Automated Testing Shows a Respect for Employees

· DevOps Zone

The DevOps zone is brought to you in partnership with Sonatype Nexus. The Nexus suite helps scale your DevOps delivery with continuous component intelligence integrated into development tools, including Eclipse, IntelliJ, Jenkins, Bamboo, SonarQube and more. Schedule a demo today

In the tech-artists.org G+ community page there was a comment on a thread about unit testing:

A key factor in TA tools is the speed at which we need to deliver them, and our audience is considerably smaller than, say, engine tools code. Therefor it becomes somewhat hard to justify the time spent on writing the unit tests, and then maintaining them as the tools change or are ported or updated to match new APIs.

In other words: Testing is great, but we don’t have time for it. Or the common alternative: Testing is great, but it’s not feasible to test what we’re doing.

Codebases without tests manifest themselves in teams that are stressed and overworked due to an ever-increasing workload and firefighting. Velocity goes down over time. Meanwhile, I’ve never known a team with thorough test coverage that delivered slower than a team without automated tests. In fact I’ve observed teams that had no tests and crunched constantly, added tests and became predictable and successful, then removed the tests after idiotic leadership decisions to artificially increase velocity, and watched their velocity drop way down once the testing infrastructure, and especially culture, fell into disrepair.

Companies that do not require automated tests do not respect their employees, and do not care about the long-term health of the company. It’s that simple (or they are incompetent, which is equally likely). We know that no testing results in stress, overwork, and reduced quality. We know that more testing results in more predictability, higher quality, and happier teams. I would love to blame management, but I see this nonchalant attitude about testing just as often among developers.

The “do it fast without tests, or do it slow with tests” attitude is not just wrong, but poisonous. You are going to be the one dealing with your technical debt. You are the bottleneck on call because your stuff breaks. You are the one who doesn’t get to work on new stuff because you spend all your time maintaining your old crap. Youare the one who is crunching to tread water on velocity.

I have a simple rule: I will not work at a job that doesn’t have automated testing (or would be in any way inhibited instituting it as the first order of business).

  • I have this rule because I love myself and my family. There are enough unavoidable opportunities to interrupt evenings and weekends for work reasons. It is irresponsible to add more ways for things to break.
  • I have this rule because I care for the people I work with. I want them to have the same option for work-life balance, and work with me for a long time.
  • I have this rule because I want the company I’ve decided to invest in (employment is the most profound investment!) to be successful in the long term. Not until the end of the quarter, or even until I leave, but for a long, long time.

The DevOps zone is brought to you in partnership with Sonatype Nexus. Use the Nexus Suite to automate your software supply chain and ensure you're using the highest quality open source components at every step of the development lifecycle. Get Nexus today


Published at DZone with permission of Rob Galanakis, DZone MVB. See the original article here.

Opinions expressed by DZone contributors are their own.

The best of DZone straight to your inbox.

Please provide a valid email address.

Thanks for subscribing!

Awesome! Check your inbox to verify your email so you can start receiving the latest in tech news and resources.

{{ parent.title || parent.header.title}}

{{ parent.tldr }}

{{ parent.urlSource.name }}