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Hey everyone. I’m writing this post from Redmond, WA. I’m in here on the Microsoft campus this week to meet with some of my colleagues and explore options for my first significant open source project effort. We’re here to spend three days trying to find ways to manage the allocation of, and monitor the billable usage of Azure resources. There are two high level objectives for this effort:

  • Allow non-technical users to provision and access Azure resources without the need to understand Azure’s terminology and even granting direct access to the underlying Azure subscription
  • Monitor the billable usage of the allocated resources, and track against a “cap”

On the surface this seems pretty simple. That is, until you realize that not all the Azure services expose individual resource usage, and of the ones that do, they all do it separately. It gets even more complicated when you realize that you may need to do things like have users “share” cloud services and even storage accounts.

Couple examples

So let’s dive into this a little more and explore a couple of the possible use cases I’ve heard from customers.

Journalism Students

Scenario: We have a series of journalism students that will be learning to provision and maintain a online content management system. They need someplace to host their website, upload content, and need GIT integration so they can version any code changes they make to their site’s code. The instructor for the course starts by creating an individual web site for them with a basic CMS system. The student will then access this workspace as they perform their coursework.

Challenges: Depending on the languages they are using, we may be able get by Azure Web Sites. But this only allows us up to 10 “free” web sites, and what happens to the other students. Additionally, students don’t know anything about the different SKUs available and just want things that work, so do we need to provide “warm-up” and auto-scaling? Additionally, since the instructor is setting up the web sites for them, we need a simple way for the instructor to get the resources provisioned, and give the students access to it without the instructor needing to even be aware of the Azure subscriptions. We also need to track compute and bandwidth usage on the individual web site.

Software Testers

Scenario: A small company has remote testers that perform quality assurance work on software. These workers are distributed but need to remote into Windows VMs to run tests. Ideally, these VMs will be hosted “in the cloud”, and the company wants a simple façade whereby the workers can select which software they need to test and then provision a virtual machine for them. The projects being tested should be “billed back” for the resources used by the testers and the testers work on multiple projects. Additionally, the testers should be able to focus on the work they have to do, not how to manage and provision Azure resources.

Challenges: This one will likely be Azure Virtual Machines. But we need to juggle not only compute/bandwidth, but track impact on storage (transactions and total amount stored) as well. We also need to be able to provision VMs from a selection of customer gallery images and get them running for the testers, sometimes across subscriptions. Finally, we need to be aware of challenges with regards to VM endpoints and cloud services if we to maximize the density of these VMs.

Business Intelligence

Scenario: Students are learning to use Oracle databases to analyze trends. The instructor is using the base Oracle database images from the Azure gallery but has added various tools and sample datasets to them for the students to use. The students will use the virtual machines for various labs over the duration of the course and each lab should only take a few hours.

Challenges: If these VMs were kept running 24×7, it would costs thousands of dollars per month per student. So we need to make sure we can automate the start and stop of the VMs to help control these costs. And since the Oracle licensing fees appear as a separate charge, we need to be able to predict these as well based on current rates and the amount of time the VM was active.

So what are we going to do about it?

In short, my plan is to create a framework that we will release via open source to help fill some of these gaps. A simple, web based user interface for accessing your allocated resources, some back end services that monitor resource usage and track that against quotas set by solution administrators. Underneath all that, a system that allows you to “tag” resources as associated with users or specific projects. If all goes well, I hope to have the first version of this framework published and available by the end of March, 2015 that will focus on Azure Web Sites, IaaS VMs, and Azure Storage.

However, and this is the point of my little announcement post, we’re not going to make you wait until this is done. As this project progresses, I plan to regularly post here and in January we’ll hopefully have a GIT repository where you’ll be able to check out the work as we progress. Furthermore, I plan to actively work with organizations that want to use this solution so that our initial version will not be the only one.

So look for more on this in the next couple weeks as we share our learnings and plans. But also, let me know via the comments if this is something you see value in and what scenario you may have. And oh, we still don’t have a name for the framework yet. So please post a comment or tweet @brentcodemonkey with your ideas. J

Until next time!

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Published at DZone with permission of Brent Stineman, DZone MVB. See the original article here.

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