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When Bash -e Doesn't Exit as You Expect

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When Bash -e Doesn't Exit as You Expect

Denny Zhang provides his simple test that explains how to deal with any unexpected or unhandled errors that involve bash -e.

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In bash scripting, it's a good practice to exit for any unexpected or unhandled errors. Usually, I enforce this by 'bash -e my_script.sh'. Today I got a surprise with 'bash -e'.

Check out the simple test below, because you might get bitten by this as well.

bash_exit.png

Source: http://dennyzhang.com/bash_errcode_exit

Here is my previous assumption: suppose we run a shell code block with 'bash -e' or 'set -e'. If any commands have problems in the middle, the whole code block shall fail and quit.

The Usual Case of 'bash -e'

As we expect in below test, "ls /wontexists" fails. Thus, we don't see the further output generated by the second echo command.

cat > /tmp/test1.sh << EOF
#!/bin/bash
echo "msg1" && ls /wontexists
echo "should not see this"
EOF

bash -xe /tmp/test1.sh
echo $?

Problematic Example: 'bash -e' Doesn't Exit

Running the below code, we will see an output of "should not see this". And $? is zero! Strange, isn't it?

cat > /tmp/test2.sh << EOF
#!/bin/bash
echo "msg1" && ls /wontexists && echo "msg2"
echo "should not see this"
EOF

bash -xe /tmp/test2.sh
echo $?

Uncover the Mystery

set -e only exits on an 'uncaught' error. The shell does not exit if the command that fails is part of the command list immediately following a while or until keyword, part of the test in an if statement, part of any command executed in a && or || list. To be simple, the shell does not exit if the command that fails is part of the command list.

The official explanation for bash -e can be found here. There is a similar discussion in Stack Overflow.

-e

Exit immediately if a pipeline (see
Pipelines), which may consist of a single
simple command (see Simple Commands), a list
(see Lists), or a compound command (see
Compound Commands) returns a non-zero
status. The shell does not exit if the
command that fails is part of the command
list immediately following a while or until
keyword, part of the test in an if statement,
part of any command executed in a && or ||
list except the command following the final
&& or ||, any command in a pipeline but the
last, or if the command’s return status is
being inverted with !. If a compound command
other than a subshell returns a non-zero
status because a command failed while -e was
being ignored, the shell does not exit. A
trap on ERR, if set, is executed before the
shell exits.

More Reading: Shell Redirect Output To File, And Still Have It On Screen.

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Topics:
devops ,bash ,linux ,code

Published at DZone with permission of Denny Zhang, DZone MVB. See the original article here.

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