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Building a Distributed Log from Scratch, Part 4: Trade-Offs and Lessons Learned

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Building a Distributed Log from Scratch, Part 4: Trade-Offs and Lessons Learned

Let's look at some key trade-offs involved with a scaling message delivery system and discuss a few lessons learned while building NATS Streaming.

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In part three of this series we talked about scaling message delivery in a distributed log. In part four, we’ll look at some key trade-offs involved with such systems and discuss a few lessons learned while building NATS Streaming.

Competing Goals

There are a number of competing goals when building a distributed log (these goals also extend to many other types of systems). Recall from part one that our key priorities for this type of system are performance, high availability, and scalability. The preceding parts of this series described at various levels how we can accomplish these three goals, but astute readers likely noticed that some of these things conflict with one another.

It’s easy to make something fast if it’s not fault-tolerant or scalable. If our log runs on a single server, our only constraints are how fast we can send data over the network and how fast the disk I/O is. And this is how a lot of systems, including many databases, tend to work — not only because it performs well, but because it’s simple. We can make these types of systems fault-tolerant by introducing a standby server and allowing clients to failover, but there are a couple issues worth mentioning with this.

With data systems, such as a log, high availability does not just pertain to continuity of service, but also availability of data. If I write data to the system and the system acknowledges that, that data should not be lost in the event of a failure. So with a standby server, we need to ensure data is replicated to avoid data loss (otherwise, in the context of a message log, we must relax our requirement of guaranteed delivery).

NATS Streaming initially shipped as a single-node system, which raised immediate concerns about production-readiness due to a single point of failure. The first step at trying to address some of these concerns was to introduce a fault-tolerance mode whereby a group of servers would run and only one would run as the active server. The active server would obtain an exclusive lock and process requests. Upon detecting a failure, standby servers would attempt to obtain the lock and become the active server.

Aside from the usual issues with distributed locks, this design requires a shared storage layer. With NATS Streaming, this meant either a shared volume, such as Gluster or EFS, or a shared MySQL database. This poses a performance challenge and isn’t particularly “cloud-native” friendly. Another issue is data is not replicated unless done so out-of-band by the storage layer. When we add in data replication, performance is hamstrung even further. But this was a quick and easy solution that offered some solace with respect to a SPOF (disclosure: I was not involved with NATS or NATS Streaming at this time). The longer term solution was to provide first-class clustering and data-replication support, but sometimes it’s more cost effective to provide fast recovery of a single-node system.

Another challenge with the single-node design is scalability. There is only so much capacity that one node can handle. At a certain point, scaling out becomes a requirement, and so we start partitioning. This is a common technique for relational databases where we basically just run multiple databases and divide up the data by some key. NATS Streaming is no different as it offers a partitioning story for dividing up channels between servers. The trouble with partitioning is it complicates things as it typically requires cooperation from the application. To make matters worse, NATS Streaming does not currently offer partitioning at the channel level, which means if a single topic has a lot of load, the solution is to manually partition it into multiple channels at the application level. This is why Kafka chose to partition its topics by default.

So performance is at odds with fault-tolerance and scalability, but another factor is what I call simplicity of mechanism. That is, the simplicity of the design plays an important role in the performance of a system. This plays out at multiple levels. We saw that, at an architectural level, using a simple, single-node design performs best but falls short as a robust solution. In part one, we saw that using a simple file structure for our log allowed us to take advantage of the hardware and operating system in terms of sequential disk access, page caching, and zero-copy reads. In part two, we made the observation that we can treat the log itself as a replicated WAL to solve the problem of data replication in an efficient way. And in part three, we discussed how a simple pull-based model can reduce complexity around flow control and batching.

At the same time, simplicity of “UX” makes performance harder. When I say UX, I mean the ergonomics of the system and how easy it is to use, operate, etc. NATS Streaming is initially optimized for UX, which is why it fills an interesting space. Simplicity is a core part of the NATS philosophy, so it caught a small mindshare with developers frustrated or overwhelmed by Kafka. There is appetite for a “Kafka lite,” something which serves a similar purpose to Kafka but without all the bells and whistles and probably not targeted at large enterprises — a classic Innovator’s Dilemma to be sure.

NATS Streaming tracks consumer positions automatically, provides simple APIs, and uses a simple push-based protocol. This also means building a client library is a much less daunting task. The downside is the server needs to do more work. With a single node, as NATS Streaming was initially designed, this isn’t much of a problem. Where it starts to rear its head is when we need to replicate that state across a cluster of nodes. This has important implications with respect to performance and scale. Smart middleware has a natural tendency to become more complex, more fragile, and slower. The end-to-end principle attests to this. Amusingly, NATS Streaming was originally named STAN because it’s the opposite of NATS, a fast and simple messaging system with minimal guarantees.

Simplicity of mechanism tends to simply push complexity around in the system. For example, NATS Streaming provides an ergonomic API to clients by shifting the complexity to the server. Kafka scales and performs exceptionally well by shifting the complexity to other parts of the system, namely the client and ZooKeeper.

Scalability and fault-tolerance are equally at odds with simplicity for reasons mostly described above. The important point here is that these cannot be an afterthought. As I learned while implementing clustering in NATS Streaming, you can’t cleanly and effectively bolt on fault-tolerance onto an existing complex system. One of the laws of Systemantics comes to mind here: “A complex system designed from scratch never works and cannot be patched up to make it work. You have to start over, beginning with a working simple system.” Scalability and fault-tolerance need to be designed from day one.

Lastly, availability is inherently at odds with consistency. This is simply the CAP theorem. Guaranteeing strong consistency requires a quorum when replicating data, which hinders availability and performance. The key here is minimize what you need to replicate or relax your requirements.

Lessons Learned

The section above already contains several lessons learned in the process of working on NATS Streaming and implementing clustering, but I’ll capture a few important ones here.

First, distributed systems are complex enough. Simple is usually better — and faster. Again, we go back to the laws of systems here: “A complex system that works is invariably found to have evolved from a simple system that works.”

Second, lean on existing work. A critical part to delivering clustering rapidly was sticking with Raft and an existing Go implementation for leader election and data replication. There was considerable time spent designing a proprietary solution before I joined which still had edge cases not fully thought through. Not only is Raft off the shelf, it’s provably correct (implementation bugs notwithstanding). And following from the first lesson learned, start with a solution that works before worrying about optimization. It’s far easier to make a correct solution fast than it is to make a fast solution correct. Don’t roll your own coordination protocol if you don’t need to (and chances are you don’t need to).

There are probably edge cases for which you haven’t written tests. There are many failures modes, and you can only write so many tests. Formal methods and property-based testing can help a lot here. Similarly, chaos and fault-injection testing such as Kyle Kingsbury’s Jepsen help too.

Lastly, be honest with your users. Don’t try to be everything to everyone. Instead, be explicit about design decisions, trade-offs, guarantees, defaults, etc. If there’s one takeaway from Kyle’s Jepsen series it’s that many vendors are dishonest in their documentation and marketing. MongoDB became infamous for having unsafe defaults and implementation issues early on, most likely because they make benchmarks look much more impressive.

In part five of this series, we’ll conclude by outlining the design for a new log-based system that draws from ideas in the previous entries in the series.

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