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Configuring AWS for Using Lambda

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Configuring AWS for Using Lambda

At a recent conference, it was discovered that one of the hardest parts of using AWS Lambda was getting it set up. Here's a step-by-step guide of how to do it.

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During the Software Craftsmanship and Testing Conference UK, Mash ran a session on AWS Lambda with examples written in Java and Python. Some other people also tried to do it in Node.js. The session is here.

The first part, mostly accidental complexity, is how to setup the account to be able to use these services. This is the part that most people struggled with, so here is a step-by-step guide.

Setting up Your Payment Method

  1. Connect to the AWS Console.

  2. Click on your name (top right), then "My Account."

  3. On the left menu, click "Payment Methods."

  4. Add a debit/credit card. This is very important, as you could go over the free tier and they would need to charge you. But with the levels of activity that we'll be using, you are included in the free tier.

Setting Up Your AWS Account

  1. Connect to the AWS Console.
  2. Go to Services, choose IAM.

  3. Create a "group" to hold these users and policies.

  4. Click "Create a new group."

  5. Pick a name for the group.
  6. Click next, choose these policies:
    • AWSLambdaFullAccess
    • IAMFullAccess
    • AmazonAPIGatewayAdministrator
  7. Next. See this page:
  8. Click "Create group."

  9. Find your new group.

  10. Click on the "Users" tab. It won't have any users, as you just created it.

  11. To create new users, go to the menu on the left, select "Users" and click the button "Create new users."

  12. You can generate as many users as you want. For a test, one is enough. Pick a name for those users. In my case, "test1_" and "test2_." Then check off "Generate an access key for each user."
  13. Click "Show User Security Credentials" to see the credentials. You'll use those to authenticate against AWS.
  14. In any case, it's better to download the credentials.
  15. Create a CSV with the tokens.
  16. Go to Groups again.
  17. Click the "users" tab, then "Add users to this group."

  18. Find or filter the users that you want, then select them.
  19. Click "Add Users."

Installing and Configuring the AWS CLI

  1. Find the installer at AWS CLI
  2. Configure it with this help page. Here's a sample of how it might look:
  3. $ aws configure
    AWS Access Key ID [****************TEST]: ##$YOUR_ACCESS_KEY##
    AWS Secret Access Key [****************TEST]: ##$YOUR_SECRET_ACCES_KEY##
    Default region name [eu-west-1]: eu-west-1 #or any other zone
    Default output format [None]: #just type enter

  4. Check that the CLI is correctly configured:
    $ aws lambda list-functions
    {
        "Functions": []
    }

  5. You can now use the services. The series continue at the next post.

This article was first published on the Codurance blog.


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Topics:
aws lambda

Published at DZone with permission of Alvaro Garcia, DZone MVB. See the original article here.

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