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Continuous Packaging: Using Cloudsmith and CircleCI to Automate Package Management And Distribution

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Continuous Packaging: Using Cloudsmith and CircleCI to Automate Package Management And Distribution

Integrating 'continuous packaging' with continuous integration platforms means automating publishing and distributing the packages your organization builds.

· Cloud Zone ·
Free Resource

Getting control — and keeping control — over the software assets your organization creates should be a priority.

That’s why at Cloudsmith we provide cloud-native private repositories that allow our customers to store, manage, secure and distribute the packages they use, both those developed internally and third-party packages and dependencies.

Doing this provides many benefits, including:

  • The ability to manage permissions at organization, team and individual level

  • The ability for packages to be shared with teams and individuals anywhere on the globe without performance compromises, and from a single consistent source of truth

  • The ability to audit the usage of assets and understand what has been used where

  • The ability to manage all assets, no matter which language and package format they are created with, in a consistent manner 

Of course, in order to access these advantages, we want to make it as easy as possible to get your packages into our system, which is where integration with CircleCI comes into the equation.

As you probably know, CircleCI is a continuous integration and delivery platform that helps teams release quality code, faster. They provide a mechanism for users to share code and libraries which can be reused across pipelines called "orbs".

Cloudsmith provides first-class support for CircleCI with our official orb. Using the orb, users can easily integrate publishing to Cloudsmith with their existing CircleCI workflows. We sometimes call that ‘continuous packaging’: automatically packaging and publishing everything you deploy in order to make it findable and available to all (permissions allowing!)

Full reference documentation for the orb can be found on the CircleCI website. This documentation is automatically generated from the orb itself and so is guaranteed to always be up to date with the latest release of the orb. Below is an example of how this process works.

Orb Usage Example

To use the orb you must first ensure you are using Circle version 2.1. At the top of your .circleci/config.yml file you should add:

YAML
 




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version: 2.1



And then include the orb:

YAML
 




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orbs:
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  cloudsmith: cloudsmith/cloudsmith@1.0.1



You'll need to configure authentication credentials for the orb. To do so, you can add an environment variable named CLOUDSMITH_API_KEY within the CircleCI settings page for your project:

Environment variables


The orb (for now) requires that you have already built the package you wish to publish. Assuming you're publishing a Python library (though the same process applies to any package type), you'll want to run setup.py sdist as a step in your job:

YAML
 




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jobs:
2
  publish:
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    executor: circleci/python:3.7
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    steps:
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      - checkout
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      - run:
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          name: Build Python package
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          command: python setup.py sdist
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workflows:
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  cloudsmith_publish:
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    jobs:
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      - publish



Once built, we can use the orb to easily publish the package. The orb provides a number of commands to make this process simpler. We'll first ensure the Cloudsmith CLI is configured and installed, then after we've built the package, publish it:

YAML
 




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jobs:
2
  publish:
3
    executor: circleci/python:3.7
4
    steps:
5
      - checkout
6
      - cloudsmith/ensure-api-key
7
      - cloudsmith/install-cli
8
      - run:
9
          name: Build Python package
10
          command: python setup.py sdist
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      - cloudsmith/publish:
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          cloudsmith-repository: myorg/myrepo
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          package-path: dist/package-*.tar.gz
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          package-type: python



Putting this all together, we end up with a .circleci/config.yaml file which looks like so:

YAML
 




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1
version: 2.1
2
 
          
3
orbs:
4
  cloudsmith: cloudsmith/cloudsmith@1.0.1
5
 
          
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jobs:
7
  publish:
8
    executor: circleci/python:3.7
9
    steps:
10
      - checkout
11
      - cloudsmith/ensure-api-key
12
      - cloudsmith/install-cli
13
      - run:
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          name: Build Python package
15
          command: python setup.py sdist
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      - cloudsmith/publish:
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          cloudsmith-repository: myorg/myrepo
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          package-path: dist/package-*.tar.gz
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          package-type: python
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workflows:
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  cloudsmith_publish:
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    jobs:
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      - publish



Manual integration

Our official orb provides simple integration for the majority of standard CI use cases, but we know that it won't fit every purpose. For additional flexibility, users can mix and match commands provided by the orb and/or use the Cloudsmith CLI directly.

For example, to use the orb to install and configure the CLI, but then use the CLI directly to publish to Cloudsmith, your configuration might look like so:

YAML
 




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23


1
version: 2.1
2
 
          
3
orbs:
4
  cloudsmith: cloudsmith/cloudsmith@1.0.1
5
 
          
6
jobs:
7
  publish:
8
    executor: circleci/python:3.7
9
    steps:
10
      - checkout
11
      - cloudsmith/ensure-api-key
12
      - cloudsmith/install-cli
13
      - run:
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          name: Build Python package
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          command: python setup.py bdist_wheel
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      - run:
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          name: Publish Python package
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          command: cloudsmith push python myorg/myrepo dist/my-package-0.1.0.whl
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workflows:
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  cloudsmith_publish:
22
    jobs:
23
      - publish



It's that easy to integrate CircleCI with Cloudsmith and start enjoying the benefits of continuous packaging!

Topics:
circleci, cloud, cloudsmith, continuous integration, devops, package management

Published at DZone with permission of Paddy Carey . See the original article here.

Opinions expressed by DZone contributors are their own.

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