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Continuum of Code Design: Between Good and Evil

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Continuum of Code Design: Between Good and Evil

Between a god class and a swarm of static methods, the two extremes, there exists a choice along this scale where your code should be, although it is often difficult to judge and often changes over time.

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How best to organize your code? At one end of the scale there is a god class – a single, massive entity that stores all possible functions; at the other end of the scale are hundreds of static methods, each in their own class. In general, these two extremes are both terrible designs. But there is a continuum of alternatives between these two extremes – choosing where along this scale your code should be is often difficult to judge and often changes over time.

Why Structure Code Matters

It’s a fair enough question – what is so bad about the two extremes? They are, really, more similar to each other than any of the points between. In one there is a single class with every method in it; in the other, I have static methods one-per class or maybe I’m using a language which doesn’t require me to even group by classes. In both cases, there is no organization. No structured larger than methods with which to help organize or group related code.

Organizing code is about making it easier for human beings to understand. The compiler or runtime doesn’t care how your code is organized, it will run it just the same. It will work the same and look the same – from the outside there is no difference. But for a developer making changes, the difference is critical. How do I find what I need to change? How can I be sure what my change will impact? How can I find other similar things that might be affected? These are all questions we have to answer when making changes to code and they require us to be able to reason about the code.

Bounded contexts help contain understanding – by limiting the size of the problem I need to think about at any one time I can focus on a smaller portion of it, but even within that bounded context organisation helps. It is much easier for me to understand how 100 methods work when they are grouped into 40 classes, with relationships between the classes that make sense in the domain – than it is for me to understand a flat list of 100 methods.

An Example

Let’s imagine we’re writing software to manage a small library (for you kids too young to remember: a library is a place where you can borrow books and return them when you’re done reading them; a book is like a physically printed blog but without the comments). We can imagine the kinds of things (methods) this system might support:

  • Add new title to the catalog
  • Add new copy of title
  • Remove copy of a title
  • User borrows a copy
  • User returns a copy
  • Register a new user
  • Print barcode for new copy
  • Fine a user for a late return
  • Pay outstanding fines for a user
  • Find title by ISBN
  • Find title by name, author
  • Find copy by scanned id
  • Change user’s address
  • List copies user has already borrowed
  • Print overdue book letter for user

This toy example is small enough that written in one-class it would probably be manageable; pretty horrible, but manageable. How else could we go about organising this?

Horizontal Split

We could split functionality horizontally: by technical concern. For example, by the database that data is stored in; or by the messaging system that’s used. This can work well in some cases, but can often lead to more god classes because your class will be as large as the surface area of the boundary layer. If this is small and likely to remain small it can be a good choice, but all too often the boundary is large or grows over time and you have another god class.

For example, functionality related to payments might be grouped simply into a PaymentsProvider – with only one or two methods we might decide it is unlikely to grow larger. Less obviously, we might group printing related functionality into a PrinterManager – while it might only have two methods now, if we later start printing marketing material or management reports the methods become less closely related and we have the beginnings of a god class.

Vertical Split

The other obvious way to organise functionality is vertically – group methods that relate to the same domain concept together. For example, we could group some of our methods into a LendingManager:

  • User borrows a copy
  • User returns a copy
  • Register a new user
  • Fine a user for a late return
  • Find copy by scanned id
  • List copies user has already borrowed

Even in our toy example this class already has six public methods. A coarse grained grouping like this often ends up being called a SomethingManager or TheOtherService. While this is sometimes a good way to group methods, the lack of clear boundary means new functionality is easily added over time and we grow ourselves a new god class.

A more fine-grained vertical grouping would organize methods into the domain objects they relate to – the recognisable nouns in the domain, where the methods are operations on those nouns. The nouns in our library example are obvious: Catalog, Title, Copy, User. Each of these has two or three public methods – but to understand the system at the outer level I only need to understand the four main domain objects and how they relate to each other, not all the individual methods they contain.

The fine-grained structure allows us to reason about a larger system than if it was unstructured. The extents of the domain objects should be relatively clear, if we add new methods to Title it is because there is some new behavior in the domain that relates to Title – functionality should only grow slowly, we should avoid new god classes; instead new functionality will tend to add new classes, with new relationships to the existing ones.

What’s the Right Way?

Obviously there’s no right answer in all situations. Even in our toy example it’s clear to see that different structures make sense for different areas of functionality. There are a range of design choices and no right or wrong answers. Different designs will ultimately all solve the same problem, but humans will find some designs easier to understand and change than others. This is what makes design such a hard problem: the right answer isn’t always obvious and might not be known for some time. Even worse, the right design today can look like the wrong design tomorrow.

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Topics:
software developers ,static methods ,god

Published at DZone with permission of David Green, DZone MVB. See the original article here.

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