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[DZone Research] The Who, When, and Why of Microservices

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[DZone Research] The Who, When, and Why of Microservices

We take a look at some survey data from our DZone Guide to Microservices, examining what respondents told us about using microservices.

· Microservices Zone ·
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This post is taken from the Key Research Findings in the 2018 DZone Guide to Microservices: Speed, Agility, Flexibility

Introduction

For the 2018 DZone Guide to Microservices, we surveyed developers, architects, and technologists from across the software and IT industry. We received 682 responses with a 79% completion rate. Based on the responses, we've put together an article who uses microservices and when and where in the SDLC microservices are used. 

It's a Microservices World After All

59% of respondents reported using microservices in some capacity, though where they implemented microservices in the SDLC proved somewhat variant. 38% use microservices in both development and production, while 16% use them in development only, and just 5% use microservices in production only. If we compare these numbers to the two most prominent types of developers in this survey (web app and enterprise business app), we see that using microservices in both development and production proved more popular among web developers. 43% of web app developers (versus 36% of enterprise business app developers) reported using microservices in both dev and prod.

Comparing the data regarding where in the SDLC respondents use microservices to the data regarding language ecosystems used by respondents, web development technologies come to the fore. 50% of respondents who work with the Node.js ecosystem reported using microservices in both development and production; this proved the highest percentage of any language ecosystem. Following Node.js, 47% of those who work with the Python ecosystem use microservices in both dev and prod, while 43% of client-side JavaScript developers and 42% of Java developers use microservices architecture in both environments.

Now that we know who is using microservices, and where in the SDLC microservices are prominent, let’s examine why developers use this architectural pattern. At 68%, microservices’ ability to make applications more easily scalable proved the most popular answer to this question among respondents. In a close second, 64% of survey takers told us that they use microservices to enable faster deployments to just one part of an application. These two uses of microservice architectures were by far the most popular, with a statistical differential of 23% separating enabling faster deployment from the third most popular use case, improving quality by having teams focus on just one piece of an app. The other notable uses, each chosen by about a third of respondents, were to improve quality by narrowing down the source of failures to a particular piece of an app (35%) and to experiment with the architecture (34%).

Interestingly, if we compare this data to the type of programming language ecosystems respondents use, we find that each language ecosystem lends itself to a different benefit of microservices. Among those working in the Java ecosystem, the most popular use case for microservices (chosen by 86%) was experimenting with architecture. For those working in the JavaScript ecosystem, improving by having teams focus on just one piece of an app (chosen by 72%) came out as the most popular option. For Node.js (45%) and Python (28%) ecosystem developers, making applications easily scalable won out.

Conclusion: Microservices Are Living Up to the Hype

Due to the benefits delineated above, 68% of respondents told us they feel microservices architecture has made their job easier, and 72% said they think the excitement around microservices is indeed warranted.

While a large majority of respondents enjoy working with microservices, we did have a small faction (99 respondents) who reported to be uninterested in microservices. The most notable reason being a lack of applicable use cases (58%). Other responses included a lack of knowledge on the subject (34%) and a lack of training (25%). All three of these critiques exhibit a rather interesting year-over-year pattern. While microservices detractors decreased from 125 respondents in 2017 to the 99 in 2018 noted earlier, the percentage of those who feel microservices has a lack of applicable use cases among this group went up by 19%. But also with the passing of a year, the percentage who claimed a lack of knowledge on the subject fell by 4%. 

This post is taken from the Key Research Findings in the 2018 DZone Guide to Microservices: Speed, Agility, Flexibility

Topics:
microservices ,microservices adoption ,microservices architecture ,dzone research ,dzone research guide

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