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Engine Yard Adopts Sun JRuby Developers

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Engine Yard Adopts Sun JRuby Developers

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Three of the key JRuby developers, who Sun previous hired to work on the full JRuby implementation have just left to join Engine Yard. Engine Yard are specialists in Ruby and Rails application development and deployment.  All three developers are huge names in the JRuby community - Charles Nutter, Thomas Enebo and Nick Sieger. It gives Engine Yard the chance to address a growing demand for JRuby applications, as currently the company's core competance is in plain Ruby.

In a ComputerWorld article, Charles Nutter indicates that the choice was made due to the uncertaintly surrounding Sun's future following Oracle's acquisition of the company:

"To be honest, we had no evidence that Oracle wouldn't support JRuby, but we also didn't have any evidence that they would," Nutter said by telephone Monday. "Two out of the three developers making this move have families; we want to make sure JRuby will get to the next level, and we had to make a decision," he said.


It was a great move of Sun's to hire these guys when they did, as it really helped to strengthen JRuby and made it a solid language on the JVM.  The change in employment won't affect this continued focus. Nutter mentions that we can expect the JRuby 1.4 release this September, and the team are focussed on ensuring that JRuby is "the best JVM language as well, and a first-class citizen on the Java platform".

So, as the Oracle takeover gets closer, it seems that at least JRuby will continue as normal.

 

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Published at DZone with permission of James Sugrue, DZone MVB. See the original article here.

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