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EvenTiles from Start to Finish - Part 4

· Mobile Zone

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In the third part of this series about how to develop a Windows Phone application from scratch we looked at the Silverlight Toolkit for Windows Phone and page transitions. Today we will work on some functionality in the Settings Page of our application. We will take off where we finished in Part 3, and start with an empty SettingsPage (except for the application name and page title).

The purpose of our complete sample application is to create a Secondary Tile programmatically and pin that to the Start Screen of the user. The Secondary Tile has a front and a back. The text on the backside of the tile can be modified by the end user. EvenTiles is not meant to be extremely useful, it is there to help introduce lots of programming aspects to develop Windows Phone applications.

In this episode we will add a few UI Elements to the SettingsPage to realize the follow functionality:

  • The text that will be displayed on the backside of the Secondary Tile is visible;
  • The backside text can be modified;
  • If the backside text differs from a default text, a button is displayed to allow easy restoration of the default backside text, otherwise the button is invisible.

The SettingsPage gets the following layout:

The layout of the UI is relatively simple. In the ContentPanel of the PhoneApplicationPage we have a StackPanel containing 3 different items (a TextBlock, a TextBox plus a hidden Button) and a ToggleSwitch (that is defined in the Silverlight Toolkit for Windows Phone). The ToggleSwitch is already visible but does currently not have any functionality associated to it. The ContentPanel itself is a Grid. Initially, a Grid has one row and one column. To place UI Elements in the Grid and to position them at a particular location you typically make use of multiple rows and/or multiple columns that you first have to define. To get the desired layout, the Grid contains 3 separate rows. In the first row (being row number 0), the StackPanel is hosted. This row takes the height it needs to display all visible UI Elements of the StackPanel. The next row on the Grid takes up whatever space is left on the grid and the last row takes precisely the height it needs to display the ToggleSwitch. The XAML for the ContentPanel looks like this:

    <!–ContentPanel – place additional content here–>
    <Grid x:Name="ContentPanel"
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
            <RowDefinition />
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
            <TextBlock HorizontalAlignment="Left"
                        Text="Set your own tile text (approx. 45 characters)"
                        Margin="12,0" />
            <TextBox x:Name="tbBackContent"
                        TextChanged="tbBackContent_TextChanged" />
            <Button x:Name="btnRestore"
                    Content="Restore Default Text"
                    Visibility="Collapsed" />
        <toolkit:ToggleSwitch Header=""
                                Content="Allow using Location?" />

You can see our Grid.RowDefinitions being defined. There is also a possibility to define Grid.ColumnDefinitions, but for this particular simple UI we only need rows. Scrolling through the XAML you can see all individual UI Elements being defined. The TextBox and the Button connect events to event handlers. For the Button, the Click event is connected to a method called btnRestore_Click. Each time the user Clicks the Button, the code that is defined in btnRestore_Click will execute. That code is defined in C#. We will take a look at the code later. The TextBox uses the TextChanged event, that will be fired each time the value of the Text property of the TextBox changes. If this happens, code inside the method tbBackContent_TextChanged will execute.

In Part 2 of EvenTiles we looked at the NavigationService that can be used to navigate from one PhoneApplicationPage to another PhoneApplicationPage. Each time the user navigates to a particular page, the OnNavigatedTo method on that page is called. You can override that method to extend its functionality. When the user navigates away from a PhoneApplication, a similar method (OnNavigatedFrom) is called that you again can override to add specific functionality you need on a particular page. In the SettingsPage of EvenTiles we are overriding both these methods to add some functionality:

OnNavigated ...

    protected override void OnNavigatedTo(System.Windows.Navigation.NavigationEventArgs e)
        tbBackContent.Text = App.ActualSecBackContent;
        btnRestore.Visibility = tbBackContent.Text.Equals(App.DefaultSecBackContent) ? Visibility.Collapsed : Visibility.Visible;
    protected override void OnNavigatedFrom(System.Windows.Navigation.NavigationEventArgs e)
        App.ActualSecBackContent = tbBackContent.Text;

Both these methods contain a call to a similar method, preceded by the keyword base. These methods execute functionality that is defined in the base class of our derived PhoneApplicationPage class. To make sure that we don’t skip that code (which might contain important functionality for page navigation) we have to call those methods. Immediately under the call to the base class methods, our own functionality is added. When we are navigating to the SettingsPage, we initialize the TextBox with the currently stored backside content for a Secondary Tile that we will create later in this series. This content is defined in a string property in the App.xaml.cs file. Next we determine if the Button that can be used to restore a default text needs to be visible. This is only the case when the TextBox displays something different from a default text that is also defined in App.xaml.cs. In App.xaml.cs the default text is assigned to the actual text.

When the user is leaving the SettingsPage (for instance by pressing the Back button on the phone), we simply store the current content of the TextBox for later use.

Let’s now take a look at the event handlers for both the Button and the TextBox:

Event Handlers

    private void tbBackContent_TextChanged(object sender, System.Windows.Controls.TextChangedEventArgs e)
        btnRestore.Visibility = tbBackContent.Text.Equals(App.DefaultSecBackContent) ? Visibility.Collapsed : Visibility.Visible;
    private void btnRestore_Click(object sender, System.Windows.RoutedEventArgs e)
        tbBackContent.Text = App.DefaultSecBackContent;

If the text in the TextBox changes, the TextChanged event handler code will execute. Just like in the OnNavigatedTo method, we determine if the Button that can be used to restore a default text needs to be visible. If the Button is clicked, we simply restore the default text. Since this also fires a TextChanged event (after all, the text of the TextBox is changed), executing code in the TextChanged event handler will now result in the Button to be hidden.

In the following video you can see all the steps that are needed to add the described functionality to the SettingsPage.

We are still far away from having all functionality in place to actually make a Secondary Tile visible on the Start Screen. However, we need to understand a few fundamental concepts in order to create successful Windows Phone applications, so we will continue with the ground work for another couple of episodes. In the next episode we will look at persisting data in IsolatedStorage to make sure that we store data when the user stops using our application.

Source: http://mstruys.com/2011/12/04/eventiles-from-start-to-finishpart-4/

The Mobile Zone is brought to you in partnership with Strongloop and IBM.  Visually compose APIs with easy-to-use tooling. Learn how IBM API Connect provides near-universal access to data and services both on-premises and in the cloud.


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