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FakeIt Series (Part 2 of 5): Shared Data and Dependencies

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FakeIt Series (Part 2 of 5): Shared Data and Dependencies

Now that you've generated your data, let's see how FakeIt handles multiple data models, giving it a leg up over other random data generators.

· Database Zone
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Learn how to move from MongoDB to Couchbase Server for consistent high performance in distributed environments at any scale.

In part one, FakeIt Series 1 of 5: Generating Fake Data, we learned that FakeIt can generate a large amount of random data based off a single YAML file and output the results to various formats and destinations, including Couchbase Server. Today we are going to explore what makes FakeIt truly unique and powerful in the world of data generation.

There are tons of random data generators available, a simple Google Search will give you more than enough to choose from. However, almost all of these have the same frustrating flaw, which is they can only ever deal with a single model. Rarely as developers do we have the luxury of dealing with a single model, more often than not we are developing against multiple models for our projects. This is where FakeIt stands out, it allows for multiple models and those models to have dependencies.

Let’s take a look at the possible models we’ll have within our e-commerce application:

  • Users
  • Products
  • Cart
  • Orders
  • Reviews

Users, the first model that we defined does not have any dependencies and the same can be said for the Products model, which we will define next. However, it would be logical to say that our Orders model would depend on both the Users and Products model. If we truly want test data, the documents created by our Orders model should be the actual random data generated from both the Users and Products models.

Products Model

Before we look at how model dependencies work in FakeIt let’s define what our Products model is going to look like.

name: Products
type: object
key: _id
properties:
  _id:
    type: string
    description: The document id
    data:
      post_build: `product_${this.product_id}`
  doc_type:
    type: string
    description: The document type
    data:
      value: product
  product_id:
    type: string
    description: Unique identifier representing a specific product
    data:
      build: faker.random.uuid()
  price:
    type: double
    description: The product price
    data:
      build: chance.floating({ min: 0, max: 150, fixed: 2 })
  sale_price:
    type: double
    description: The product price
    data:
      post_build: |
       let sale_price = 0;
       if (chance.bool({ likelihood: 30 })) {
         sale_price = chance.floating({ min: 0, max: this.price * chance.floating({ min: 0, max: 0.99, fixed: 2 }), fixed: 2 });
       }
       return sale_price;
  display_name:
    type: string
    description: Display name of product.
    data:
      build: faker.commerce.productName()
  short_description:
    type: string
    description: Description of product.
    data:
      build: faker.lorem.paragraphs(1)
  long_description:
    type: string
    description: Description of product.
    data:
      build: faker.lorem.paragraphs(5)
  keywords:
    type: array
    description: An array of keywords
    items:
      type: string
      data:
        min: 0
        max: 10
        build: faker.random.word()
  availability:
    type: string
    description: The availability status of the product
    data:
      build: |
       let availability = 'In-Stock';
       if (chance.bool({ likelihood: 40 })) {
         availability = faker.random.arrayElement([ 'Preorder', 'Out of Stock', 'Discontinued' ]);
       }
       return availability;
  availability_date:
    type: integer
    description: An epoch time of when the product is available
    data:
      build: faker.date.recent()
      post_build: new Date(this.availability_date).getTime()
  product_slug:
    type: string
    description: The URL friendly version of the product name
    data:
      post_build: faker.helpers.slugify(this.display_name).toLowerCase()
  category:
    type: string
    description: Category for the Product
    data:
      build: faker.commerce.department()
  category_slug:
    type: string
    description: The URL friendly version of the category name
    data:
      post_build: faker.helpers.slugify(this.category).toLowerCase()
  image:
    type: string
    description: Image URL representing the product.
    data:
      build: faker.image.image()
  alternate_images:
    type: array
    description: An array of alternate images for the product
    items:
      type: string
      data:
        min: 0
        max: 4
        build: faker.image.image()


This model is a little more complex than our previous Users model. Let’s examine a few of this property in more detail:

  • _id: This value is being set after every property in the document has been build and is available to the post build function. This context is that of the current document being generated
  • sale_price: This using defining a 30% chance of a sale price and if there is a sale price ensuring that the value is less than that of the price property
  • keywords: Is an array. This defined similarly to Swagger, we define our array items and how we want them constructed using the build / post_build functions. Additionally, we can define min and max values and FakeIt will generate a random number of array elements between these values. There is also a fixed property that can be used to generate a set number of array elements.

Now that we’ve constructed our Products model let’s generate some random data and output it to the console to see what it looks like using the command:

Here's the FakeIt console models/products.yaml:

Orders Model

For our project we have already defined the following models:

  • users.yaml
  • products.yaml

Let’s start by defining or Orders model without any properties and specifying its dependencies:

name: Orders
type: object
key: _id
data:
  dependencies:
    - products.yaml
    - users.yaml
properties:


We have defined two dependencies for our Orders model, and referenced them by their file name. Since all of our models are stored in the same directory there is no reason to specify the full path. At runtime, FakeIt will first parse all of the models before attempting to generate documents, and it will determine a run order based on each of the models dependencies (if any).

Each of the build functions in a FakeIt model is a function body, with the following arguments passed to it.

function (documents, globals, inputs, faker, chance, document_index, require) {
    return faker.internet.userName();
}


Once the run order has been established, each of the dependencies are saved in-memory and made available to the dependant model through the documents argument. This argument is an object containing a key for each model whose value is an array of each document that has been generated. For our example of the documents property it will look similar to this:

{
    "Users": [
         ...
    ],
    "Products": [
        ...
    ]
}


We can take advantage of this to retrieve random Product and User documents assigning their properties to properties within our Orders model. For example, we can retrieve a random user_id from the documents generated by the Users model and assign that to the user_id of the Orders model through a build function

user_id:
    type: integer
    description: The user_id that placed the order
    data:
      build: faker.random.arrayElement(documents.Users).user_id;


Let’s define what the rest of our Orders model will look like:

name: Orders
type: object
key: _id
data:
  dependencies:
    - products.yaml
    - users.yaml
properties:
  _id:
    type: string
    description: The document id
    data:
      post_build: `order_${this.order_id}`
  doc_type:
    type: string
    description: The document type
    data:
      value: "order"
  order_id:
    type: integer
    description: The order_id
    data:
      build: document_index + 1
  user_id:
    type: integer
    description: The user_id that placed the order
    data:
      build: faker.random.arrayElement(documents.Users).user_id;
  order_date:
    type: integer
    description: An epoch time of when the order was placed
    data:
      build: new Date(faker.date.past()).getTime()
  order_status:
    type: string
    description: The status of the order
    data:
      build: faker.random.arrayElement([ 'Pending', 'Processing', 'Cancelled', 'Shipped' ])
  billing_name:
    type: string
    description: The name of the person the order is to be billed to
    data:
      build: `${faker.name.firstName()} ${faker.name.lastName()}`
  billing_phone:
    type: string
    description: The billing phone
    data:
      build: faker.phone.phoneNumber().replace(/x[0-9]+$/, '')
  billing_email:
    type: string
    description: The billing email
    data:
      build: faker.internet.email()
  billing_address_1:
    type: string
    description: The billing address 1
    data:
      build: `${faker.address.streetAddress()} ${faker.address.streetSuffix()}`
  billing_address_2:
    type: string
    description: The billing address 2
    data:
      build: chance.bool({ likelihood: 50 }) ? faker.address.secondaryAddress() : null
  billing_locality:
    type: string
    description: The billing city
    data:
      build: faker.address.city()
  billing_region:
    type: string
    description: The billing region, city, province
    data:
      build: faker.address.stateAbbr()
  billing_postal_code:
    type: string
    description: The billing zip code / postal code
    data:
      build: faker.address.zipCode()
  billing_country:
    type: string
    description: The billing region, city, province
    data:
      value: US
  shipping_name:
    type: string
    description: The name of the person the order is to be billed to
    data:
      build: `${faker.name.firstName()} ${faker.name.lastName()}`
  shipping_address_1:
    type: string
    description: The shipping address 1
    data:
      build: `${faker.address.streetAddress()} ${faker.address.streetSuffix()}`
  shipping_address_2:
    type: string
    description: The shipping address 2
    data:
      build: chance.bool({ likelihood: 50 }) ? faker.address.secondaryAddress() : null
  shipping_locality:
    type: string
    description: The shipping city
    data:
      build: faker.address.city()
  shipping_region:
    type: string
    description: The shipping region, city, province
    data:
      build: faker.address.stateAbbr()
  shipping_postal_code:
    type: string
    description: The shipping zip code / postal code
    data:
      build: faker.address.zipCode()
  shipping_country:
    type: string
    description: The shipping region, city, province
    data:
      value: US
  shipping_method:
    type: string
    description: The shipping method
    data:
      build: faker.random.arrayElement([ 'USPS', 'UPS Standard', 'UPS Ground', 'UPS 2nd Day Air', 'UPS Next Day Air', 'FedEx Ground', 'FedEx 2Day Air', 'FedEx Standard Overnight' ]);
  shipping_total:
    type: double
    description: The shipping total
    data:
      build: chance.dollar({ min: 10, max: 50 }).slice(1)
  tax:
    type: double
    description: The tax total
    data:
      build: chance.dollar({ min: 2, max: 10 }).slice(1)
  line_items:
    type: array
    description: The products that were ordered
    items:
      type: string
      data:
        min: 1
        max: 5
        build: |
         const random = faker.random.arrayElement(documents.Products);
         const product = {
            product_id: random.product_id,
            display_name: random.display_name,
            short_description: random.short_description,
            image: random.image,
            price: random.sale_price || random.price,
            qty: faker.random.number({ min: 1, max: 5 }),
         };
         product.sub_total = product.qty * product.price;
         return product;
  grand_total:
    type: double
    description: The grand total of the order
    data:
      post_build: |
       let total = this.tax + this.shipping_total;
       for (let i = 0; i < this.line_items.length; i++) {
         total += this.line_items[i].sub_total;
       }
       return chance.dollar({ min: total, max: total }).slice(1);


And output it to the console using the command:

And here's the fakeit console models/orders.yaml:


As you can see from the console output, the documents were generated for the Users and Products models, and those documents were made available to the Orders model. However, they were excluded from output because all that was requested to be output was the Orders model.

Now that we have defined 3 models with dependencies (Users, Products, and Orders), we need to be able to generate multiple documents for each of these and output them to Couchbase Server. Up to this point we have been specifying the number of documents to generate via the –count command line argument. We can specify the number of documents or a range of documents by using the data: property at the root of the model.

users.yaml

name: Users
type: object
key: _id
data:
  min: 1000
  max: 2000
products.yaml

name: Products
type: object
key: _id
data:
  min: 4000
  max: 5000
orders.yaml

name: Orders
type: object
key: _id
data:
  dependencies:
    - products.yaml
    - users.yaml
  min: 5000
  max: 6000


We can now generate random sets of related document models and output those documents directly into Couchbase Server using the command:

fakeit couchbase --server 127.0.0.1 --bucket ecommerce --verbose models/

Conclusion

We’ve seen through three simple FakeIt YAML models how we can create model dependencies allowing for randomly generated data to be related across models and streamed into Couchbase Server. We’ve also seen how we can specify the number of documents to generate by model by using the data: property at the root of a model.

These models can be stored in your project's repository, taking up very little space and allow your developers to generate the same data structures with completely different data. Another advantage of being able to generate documents through multi-model relationships is to explore different document models and see how they perform with various N1QL queries.

Want to deliver a whole new level of customer experience? Learn how to make your move from MongoDB to Couchbase Server.

Topics:
fakeit ,data model ,data generation ,database ,tutorial

Published at DZone with permission of Laura Czajkowski, DZone MVB. See the original article here.

Opinions expressed by DZone contributors are their own.

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