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How Do Leaked Cyber Weapons Change the Threat Landscape for Businesses?

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How Do Leaked Cyber Weapons Change the Threat Landscape for Businesses?

Unfortunately, rogue hackers or hacktivists aren't the only ones out there looking to bombard your system. Learn what the latest big time leak could mean for you.

· Security Zone
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Recently, a group called Shadow Brokers released hundreds of megabytes of tools that they claim came from the NSA and other intelligence organizations. Ars Technica has written extensively on the subject. The exploits target several Microsoft products still in service (and commonly used), as well as the SWIFT banking network. Adding speculation to the case is the fact that Microsoft silently released patches to vulnerabilities claimed to be zero days in the leaked code prior to the actual leak. But what does all of this mean for “the rest of us”?

shadowbroker

Analysis shows that lifecycle management of software needs to be proactive, considering the security features of new products against the threat landscape prior to end-of-life for existing systems as a best practice. The threat from secondary adversaries may be increasing due to the availability of new tools, and the intelligence agencies have also demonstrated a willingness to target organizations in “friendly” countries; nation-state actors should thus include domestic ones in threat modeling.

There are two key questions we need to ask and try to answer:

  1. Should threat models include domestic nation-state actors, including illegal use of intelligence capabilities against domestic targets?
  2. Does the availability of the leaked tools increase the threat from secondary actors, e.g. organized crime groups?

Taking on the first issue first: should we include domestic intelligence in threat models for “normal” businesses? Let us examine the CIA security triangle from this perspective.

  • Confidentiality: are domestic intelligence organizations interested in stealing intellectual property or obtaining intelligence on critical personnel within the firm? This tends to be either supply chain driven if you are not yourself the direct target. Data collection may also occur due to innocent links to other organizations that are being targeted by the intelligence unit.
  • Integrity (data manipulation): if your supply chain is involved in activities drawing sufficient attention to require offensive operations, including non-cyber operations, integrity breaches are possible.
  • Availability: nation-state actors are not the typical adversary that will use DoS-type attacks unless it is to mask other intelligence activities by drawing response capabilities to the wrong frontier.

The probability of APT activities from domestic intelligence is still low for most firms. The primary sectors where this could be a concern are critical infrastructure and financial institutions.

The second question was if the leak poses an increased threat from other adversary types, such as organized crime groups. Organized crime groups run structured operations across multiple sectors, both legal and illegal. They tend to be opportunistic and any new tools being made available that can support their primary cybercrime activities will most likely be made use of quickly. The typical high-risk activities include credit card and payment fraud, document fraud and identity theft, illicit online trade including stolen intellectual property, and extortion schemes by direct blackmail or use of malware. The leaked tools can support several of these activities, including extortion schemes and information theft. This indicates that the risk level does in fact increase with the leaks of additional exploit packages.

How should we now apply this knowledge in our security governance?

  • The tools use exploits in older versions of operating systems. Keeping systems up-to-date remains crucial. New versions of Windows tend to come with improved security. Migration prior to end-of-life of the previous version should be considered.
  • In risk assessments, domestic intelligence should be considered together with foreign intelligence and proxy actors. Stakeholder and value chain links remain key drivers for this type of threat.
  • Organized crime: targeted threats are value chain driven. Most likely increased exposure due to new cyberweapons available to the organized crime groups for firms with exposure and old infrastructure.

Find out how Synopsys can help you build security and quality into your SDLC and supply chain. We offer application testing and remediation expertise, guidance for structuring a software security initiative, training, and professional services for a proactive approach to application security.

Topics:
security ,security attacks ,security risks

Published at DZone with permission of Hakon Olsen, DZone MVB. See the original article here.

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