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How to Create from Scratch the Concept of an Engaging Mobile App

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How to Create from Scratch the Concept of an Engaging Mobile App

So you got a big idea for a mobile app, and you want to create its concept from scratch. Look here to see what steps you should be taking to get started.

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So you got a big idea for a mobile app, and you want to create its concept from scratch. If this is why you are reading this blog, then congratulations are in order. You not only have a promising project to work on, but you also understand that you can just straight into building it without considering the concept first.

This step is extremely important, especially if you aren’t the person who will develop the app itself. And it is because the professional in charge of the task needs to know what you are expecting to get, and how they should be delivering – information that only a detailed project can give to them.

So let’s see how you can create your very own concept of an engaging mobile app from scratch.

# 1 – Define Your Goal

The first thing that you will need to have clear is your goal. In other words, why are you creating this app at all? What are you hoping to accomplish and what the app should give you back as a result?

It is crucial that your goal is something attainable and measurable, so you will be able to verify if you have achieved it or not when the time comes. Of course, you can change your mind later, but remember that it might mean changing the entire app.

# 2 – Define Your Target Audience

Now you need to figure out who will be using your app. You will need to know some demographics, such as age group, location, and gender, but you will need to go much further than that. It is crucial that you understand how and why they would download your app and not another one with so many options available.

That is to say that you need to ensure that your app will be answering to some need or expectation that no other app can do, or in a way that it is better than what has been done so far. And all these answers will have a direct impact on the way that you will design and on the content that you will add to your website.

# 3 – Lay out Your App

Now it is time for you to write down all the features that your app will have screen after screen. The best way to do it is by using a wireframe tool, as it will allow you to show visually what you want to be created.

Even if you are the one developing your app, you will want to do it very carefully. If you forget to add something and try to include it in a later stage, you have to deal with a lot of extra work.

So it is best that you take your time and think about everything that should be in your app, and then show it as visually as possible – remember, it is an app, not an e-book.

4 – Analyse the Feasibility of Your Idea

You got your dream on paper, and you are in love with it. Great. But, unfortunately, the next step is to verify if your idea is feasible. Maybe there aren't technical resources ready to do what you want. Maybe it is just too expensive to get it done. Maybe it won’t meet the requirements of App Store or Google Play.

If you notice any problem with your project, it is time for you to make adjustments. Leave your heart somewhere else and tell yourself that an app that doesn’t get published and used is a complete waste of time. And do what you got to do.

# 5 – Consider Planning Versions

One of the problems that you might have is the money required to invest in your idea. If so, don’t despair. Why don’t you consider publishing a basic version first, feel the market, get some money from it, and then reinvest it in a second version of the app with extra features?

We are talking about a common practice in this market, so your clients won’t be upset by it. Actually, they will find very strange if you just don’t update your app frequently – they will think that you have abandoned it. Plus, if you got a great idea, you better release it as soon as possible even in beta version, before someone has the same idea.

# 6 – Discuss Your Concept With your developer and designer

Now you have your concept good to go, but you need to go through one more step. You will present your idea to a mobile app design and developer – it might be two professional or one that can do both. They have more experience than you in the area and can tell you if your app can really be created as you think.

Give to them a written copy of your project along with all the visuals you created. It must be as easy to understand as possible, so if you need help on it, you should ask the help of an online writing service, such as the essay republic, to write it for you.

Prepare to be happy if you get to be told that some of the planned features are just not possible to implement. Or that it would take so long that the market might have changed when it gets done. So, again, make the necessary adjustments, and thank them for saving you time and money.

And if you are planning to develop it by yourself, still try and get some advice from a colleague that you trust. You can also ask someone that fits your target audience to have a look at your mock-up and tell if they would have to use your app. Any information is very helpful at this stage.

The Bottom Line

Creating the concept of a mobile app from scratch is easy. The challenge is taking the time to think about it, do the necessary research, and write it down.

But, if you get yourself to do it, then you can be sure that your chances of publishing a highly successful app will be much higher than ever.

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Topics:
app ,mobile app ,app building ,mobile

Published at DZone with permission of Dante Munnis. See the original article here.

Opinions expressed by DZone contributors are their own.

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