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I Don't Measure Code Coverage

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I Don't Measure Code Coverage

· DevOps Zone
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I believe that test coverage is an unhelpful measure. I have two main reasons behind this belief: Firstly, test coverage often gives false positives and false negatives; and secondly, too many badly written tests will slow a project down (that is, higher coverage can mean lower habitability).

It is relatively easy to write tests that exercise code without actually checking it for correctness. So high test coverage does not necessarily correlate with correctness and completeness. Conversely, low automated test coverage does not imply that the software is untested, nor does imply the presence of defects.

It is also relatively easy to write tests that enshrine bad design. In codebases with high coupling and low cohesion, high test coverage probably means that those poor designs are difficult to improve without breaking tests. For example, in code that is procedural, incohesive and highly coupled, tests that simply “mock out” every one of an object’s dependencies (read: use a mock library to stub out the dependencies) will likely increase the cost of changing the design later; whereas tests that have been used to drive roles into the design will ultimately help to make the code easier to change — but only if the fundamental design structures in the code mirror those in the domain.

So it is my belief that good design trumps test coverage, and I therefore prefer to focus on design measures first. (More on those later…) Note that I am not saying that automated testing is bad, nor indeed that high automated test coverage is bad. I am saying that high test coverage is not a good measure of software habitability.

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Published at DZone with permission of Kevin Rutherford, DZone MVB. See the original article here.

Opinions expressed by DZone contributors are their own.

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