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Infrastructure as Code: Using Git to Deploy F5 iRules Automagically

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Infrastructure as Code: Using Git to Deploy F5 iRules Automagically

A real life example of how we can apply infrastructure as code, one of the key steps towards a true devops environment

· DevOps Zone
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Many approaches within DevOps take the view that infrastructure must be treated like code to realize true continuous deployment. The TL;DR on the concept is simply this: infrastructure configuration and related code (like that created to use data path programmability)  should be treated like, well, code. That is, it should be stored in a repository, versioned, and automatically pulled as part of the continuous deployment process. This is one of the foundational concepts that enables immutable infrastructure, particularly for infrastructure tasked with providing application services like load balancing, web application security, and optimization.

Getting there requires that you not only have per-application partitioning of configuration and related artifacts (templates, code, etc…) but a means to push those artifacts to the infrastructure for deployment. In other words, an API.

A BIG-IP, whether appliance, virtual, cloud, or some combination thereof, provides the necessary per-application partitioning required to support treating its app services (load balancing, web app security, caching, etc..) as “code”.

big-ip-programmability

A whole lot of apps being delivered today take advantage of the programmability available (iRules) to customize and control everything from scalability to monitoring to supporting new protocols. It’s code, so you know that means it’s pretty flexible.

So it’s not only code, but it’s application-specific code, and that means in the big scheme of continuous deployment, it should be treated like code. It should be versioned, managed, and integrated into the (automated) deployment process.

And if you’re standardized on Git, you’d probably like the definition of your scalability service (the load balancing) and any associated code artifacts required (like some API version management, perhaps) to be stored in Git and integrated into the CD pipeline. Cause, automation is good. update big-ip git

Well have I got news for you! I wish I’d coded this up (but I don’t do as much of that as I used to) but that credit goes to DevCentral community member Saverio. He wasn’t the only one working on this type of solution, but he was the one who coded it up and shared it on Git (and here on DevCentral) for all to see and use.

The basic premise is that the system uses Git as a repository for iRules (BIG-IP code artifacts) and then sets up a trigger such that whenever that iRule is committed, it’s automagically pushed back into production.

Now being aware that DevOps isn’t just about automagically pushing code around (especially in production) there’s certain to be more actual steps here in terms of process. You know, like code reviews because we are talking about code here and commits as part of a larger process, not just because you can.

That caveat aside, the bigger takeaway is that the future of infrastructure relies as much on programmability – APIs, templates, and code – as it does on the actual services it provides. Infrastructure as Code, whether we call it that or not, is going to continue to shift left into production. The operational process management we generally like to call “orchestration” and “data center automation" , like its forerunner, business process management, will start requiring a high degree of programmability and integratability (is too a word, I just made it up) to ensure the infrastructure isn’t impeding the efficiency of the deployment process.

Code on, my friends. Code on.

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Topics:
devops ,deployment ,git

Published at DZone with permission of Lori MacVittie, DZone MVB. See the original article here.

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