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IT Death Smells Like Kickstart Files

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IT Death Smells Like Kickstart Files

Custom kickstarts (and other site-specific boot provisioning scripts) are dangerous, and maintaining kickstarts is fatal for many reasons.

· DevOps Zone ·
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Recently, I was on a call with an IT Ops manager who insisted that his team had their on-premises operations under control with “Python scripts and manual kickstart files” because they “really don’t change their infrastructure setup.” He explained that he and his team was comfortable with this because it was something they understood and did not require learning new systems. While I understand his position, I was sort of sad for him and his employer because no value is created for his company by maintaining custom kickstarts.

Maintaining kickstarts is fatal for many reasons. Is there a way to make it less fatal? Yes, and it involves investing in learning tools that let you move up the stack.

Contrary to popular IT mythology, managing physical infrastructure is still a reality for many IT teams and will remain a part of best practices until every workload simply runs on Amazon and it becomes their problem. Since that “Utopian” future is unlikely, let’s deal with some practical realities of hybrid IT.

Here are my six reasons why custom kickstarts (and other site-specific boot provisioning scripts) are dangerous.

1. Creating Site Unique Processes

Every infrastructure is unique. That’s a practical reality that we have to accept because otherwise, we would never be able to make improvements and corrections without touching everything that already deployed. However, we really want to work hard to minimize places where we inject variation into the environment. That means that server and site-specific kickstarts with lots of post-provisioning steps force operators to maintain additional information about each server.

2. Building Server Specific Configurations

When we create server specific templates, it becomes nearly impossible to recreate server builds. That directly leads to fragile infrastructure because teams cannot quickly redeploy or automate refreshes. Static IT infrastructure is a known fail pattern and makes enterprises vulnerable to staff changes, hacking and inability to manage and patch.

3. Having Opaque Configurations

Kickstart is hard to understand (and even harder to troubleshoot). When teams take actions during the provisioning process they are often not tracked or managed like other operational scripting tools. Failures or injections can easily go undetected. Even if they are tracked, the number of operators who can read and manage these scripts is limited. That means that critical aspects of your operational environment happen outside of your awareness.

4. Being Less Secure

Kickstart processes generally include injecting SSH keys, certificates, and other authentication credentials. These embedded credentials are often hard coded into the process with a minimal awareness of the operational team leaving you vulnerable at the most foundational level. This is not an acceptable security process; however, teams who hack kickstarts often don’t want to consider the implications.

Security side note: most teams don’t have the expertise to integrate TPM or HSM into their kickstart processes; consequently, these key security technologies are generally unused and ignored. If you want to talk about this, please contact me!

5. Diverging Provisioning Patterns

Cloud does not use kickstarts. Provisioning variation increases when teams keep/add logic and configuration into server provisioning instead of doing it as post-provision automation. If your physical provisioning team is not rehearsing on the cloud, then you’re in a serious IT hole because all workloads should be managed as hybrid-ready. Deployment fidelity helps accelerate teams and reduces cost.

6. Reusing Community Practice

Finally, managing your own kickstarts makes it impossible to leverage community patterns and practices. Kickstarts are not exactly a hive of innovation so you are not creating any competitive advantage by adding variation there. In cases like that, reusing community tooling is a net benefit to your organization. Why have we not done this already? Until recently, provisioning tools were not API-driven or focused on reusable shared practice.

It’s not too late to “:q!” those kickstart edits and accelerate your infrastructure.

Learn how to get 20x more performance than Elastic by moving to a Time Series database.

Topics:
devops ,kickstart files ,information technology ,scripts

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