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JAX-RS 2.X using Jersey Client: Basic Example

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JAX-RS 2.X using Jersey Client: Basic Example

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JAX-RS is a framework designed to help you write RESTful applications both on the client and server side. Jersey 2.0 provides Reference Implementation for JAX-RS 2.0.

Jersey 2.0 provides support for Java SE HTTP Server, Grizzly 2 HTTP server, Servlet 2.5 or higher containers as well as OSGi containers on the server side and HTTPURLConnection - based or Grizzly asynchronous client transport connectors. To leverage JAX-RS/Jersey server-side async features in a Servlet container, you need a container that supports Servlet 3.0 at least. Jersey supports asynchronous resource invocations on Grizzly 2 HTTP server too.

Basic JAX-RS 2.0 Example:


Project Structure




web.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<web-app xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee" xmlns:web="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee/web-app_2_5.xsd" xsi:schemaLocation="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee/web-app_3_0.xsd" id="WebApp_ID" version="3.0">
  <display-name>JAX-RS-2.0_HelloWorld</display-name>
  <servlet>
        <servlet-name>Jersey Web Application</servlet-name>
        <servlet-class>org.glassfish.jersey.servlet.ServletContainer</servlet-class>
        <init-param>
            <param-name>jersey.config.server.provider.packages</param-name>
            <param-value>com.example</param-value>
        </init-param>
        <load-on-startup>1</load-on-startup>
    </servlet>
    <servlet-mapping>
        <servlet-name>Jersey Web Application</servlet-name>
        <url-pattern>/webapi/*</url-pattern>

    </servlet-mapping>
</web-app>



MyResource.java


package com.example;

import javax.ws.rs.GET;
import javax.ws.rs.Path;
import javax.ws.rs.Produces;
import javax.ws.rs.core.MediaType;

/**
 * Root resource (exposed at "myresource" path)
 */
@Path("myresource")
public class MyResource {

    /**
     * Method handling HTTP GET requests. The returned object will be sent
     * to the client as "text/plain" media type.
     *
     * @return String that will be returned as a text/plain response.
     */
    @GET
    @Produces(MediaType.TEXT_PLAIN)
    public String getIt() {
        return "Got it!";
    }
}



index.jsp


<html>
<body>
    <h2>Jersey RESTful Web Application!</h2>
    <p><a href="webapi/myresource">Jersey resource</a>
    <p>Visit <a href="http://jersey.java.net">Project Jersey website</a>
    for more information on Jersey!
</body>
</html>

Running on Apache Tomcat Server





Clicking on "Jersey resource" link will call MyResource web service





That's all !!!

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Topics:
java ,frameworks ,web services ,j2ee ,rest ,tips and tricks ,tools & methods ,jersey ,jax-rs 2.0 ,restful web service

Published at DZone with permission of Sunil Gulabani. See the original article here.

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