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Making The Most of Projects To Drive Systematic Reuse

· DevOps Zone

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Systematic reuse takes conscious, disciplined effort – question is – where are the systematic reuse opportunities? how can we maximize these opportunities? – it may or may not surprise you that there is rarely a special, designated ‘project’ to achieve reuse or build a reusable API. Teams are busy and they want to solve tangible problems – they work on projects more often than reusable libraries and services. Some reuse advocates lament this situtation – they wish the organization supports systematic reuse with a protected budget, appropriate team members, and the organizational mandate to enforce reuse APIs and standards. I used to wish this too and I was wrong – way off the mark :-)

Now for the good news – the great thing about the lack of a reuse budget is that, you can focus on the more important thing: achieving business objectives either by saving costs, creating new revenue lines, and reducing uncessary risk. Projects have the necessary business objectives baked into them – that’s why they are funded, resourced, executed, and tracked. Finally, they have an important constraint: time. Projects have deadlines. Schedule risk is a key one with reuse efforts and having a project deadline ensures the asset is going to be useful and relevant to the project at hand.

Below are a few tips to get the maximum out of projects:

  • Review the requirements – whether it is a set of tickets, a sprint plan, or a formal document – review and categorize requirements into ones that are specific to the project, common to the product line, and common across projects.
  • Ensure you are engaged with the development team throughout the project lifecycle – reviewing and identifying opportunities for identifying, leveraging, and refactoring code. Very often, reviews are done long after development is complete with an impending deadline. This leaves little room for introspection, refactoring, or improvements to the codebase.
  • Identify existing components and services that are potential reuse candidates – most importantly, identify assets that are readily reusable (even if they are part of an existing project codebase), ones that need minor refactoring, and ones that need substantial refactoring / development. Minor refactorings and enhancements which can be done in parallel while users are testing / verifying functionality is one of many possibilities.
  • Insist on development teams using agreed upon interfaces for reuse-eligible functionality. Dev teams can either create a bespoke implementation, fork off an existing implementation, or leverage a reusable API.  However, none of this is possible if the projects use bespoke classes / APIs. Interfaces give your team the freedom and pluggability to swap implementations, evolve asset maturity, and ultimately carve code off the project to seed and grow a reusable API. It doesn’t matter if the interface is implemented by a local component, a remote service, with or without persistence, etc. – the implementation will depend on performance and resiliency characteristics in addition to functional needs.

Download “The DevOps Journey - From Waterfall to Continuous Delivery” to learn learn about the importance of integrating automated testing into the DevOps workflow, brought to you in partnership with Sauce Labs.


Published at DZone with permission of Vijay Narayanan, DZone MVB. See the original article here.

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