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Maven repositories in anger!

Every build systems worth his salt acknowledges Maven dependencies repository. Even those vehemently opposed to the way Maven does things, like Gradle, still uses repo1.

Wait, repo1? If there was only repo1. But nowadays, every project publishes its artifacts in its own repository. For some providers, like SpringSource and JBoss, I think it may be for marketing reasons. But whatever the reasons are, it only makes the job of the enterprise repository manager harder, since he has to reference all those repositories.

I also stumbled upon another serious glitch in repositories this week. My client bought JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP) 5.0. Now, suppose we want to compile our code against JBoss EAP’s libraries using Maven. Guess what? Those libraries are available in no accessible repository: check this issue if you don’t believe me. Now, support proposes two solutions:

  • Either manually put EAP’s libraries in our own repository, reconstructing each POM
  • Or use Maven’s system path to point to a local (or network) JBoss EAP

Is this really the level of support we are expecting from a major player like Red Hat? Unfortunately, this is only a single real-world example of things going awry regarding Maven repositories. I’m afraid there are more going around beyond my meager knowledge, and even more to come.

Repo1 was meant to ease our life. I really wish we could go back to this simple scheme once again: stop tackling problems brought by providers and provide answers to problems brought by the business.

 

From http://blog.frankel.ch/maven-repositories-in-anger

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