Over a million developers have joined DZone.
{{announcement.body}}
{{announcement.title}}

Message passing, performance

DZone's Guide to

Message passing, performance

Free Resource

RavenDB vs MongoDB: Which is Better? This White Paper compares the two leading NoSQL Document Databases on 9 features to find out which is the best solution for your next project.  

I got some replies about the async event loop post, mentioning LMAX Disruptor and performance. I decided to see for myself what the fuss was all about.

You can read about the LMAX Disruptor, but basically, it is a very fast single process messaging library.

I wondered what that meant, so I wrote my own messaging library:

public class Bus<T>
{
Queue<T> q = new Queue<T>();

public void Enqueue(T msg)
{
lock (q)
{
q.Enqueue(msg);
}
}

public bool TryDequeue(out T msg)
{
lock (q)
{
if (q.Count == 0)
{
msg = default(T);
return false;
}
msg = q.Dequeue();
return true;
}
}
}

I think that you’ll agree that this is a thing of beauty and elegant coding. I then tested this with the following code:

public static void Read(Bus<string> bus)
{
int count = 0;
var sp = Stopwatch.StartNew();
while (sp.Elapsed.TotalSeconds < 10)
{
string msg;
while (bus.TryDequeue(out msg))
{
count++;
}
}
sp.Stop();

Console.WriteLine("{0:#,#;;0} msgs in {1} for {2:#,#} ops/sec", count, sp.Elapsed, (count / sp.Elapsed.TotalSeconds));
}

public static void Send(Bus<string> bus)
{
var sp = Stopwatch.StartNew();
while (sp.Elapsed.TotalSeconds < 10)
{
for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
{
bus.Enqueue("test");
}
}
}

var bus = new Bus<string>();

ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(state => Send(bus));

ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(state => Read(bus));

The result of this code?

145,271,000 msgs in 00:00:10.4597977 for 13,888,510 ops/sec

Now, what happens when we use the DataFlow’s BufferBlock as the bus?

public static async Task ReadAsync(BufferBlock<string> bus)
{
int count = 0;
var sp = Stopwatch.StartNew();
while (sp.Elapsed.TotalSeconds < 10)
{
try
{
await bus.ReceiveAsync(TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(5));
count++;
}
catch (TaskCanceledException e)
{
}
}
sp.Stop();

Console.WriteLine("{0:#,#;;0} msgs in {1} for {2:#,#} ops/sec", count, sp.Elapsed, (count / sp.Elapsed.TotalSeconds));
}

public static async Task SendAsync(BufferBlock<string> bus)
{
var sp = Stopwatch.StartNew();
while (sp.Elapsed.TotalSeconds < 10)
{
for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
{
await bus.SendAsync("test");
}
}
}

What we get is:

43,268,149 msgs in 00:00:10 for 4,326,815 ops/sec.

I then decided to check what happens with the .NET port of the LMAX Disruptor. Here is the code:

public class Holder
{
public string Val;
}

internal class CounterHandler : IEventHandler<Holder>
{
public int Count;
public void OnNext(Holder data, long sequence, bool endOfBatch)
{
Count++;
}
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
var disruptor = new Disruptor.Dsl.Disruptor<Holder>(() => new Holder(), 1024, TaskScheduler.Default);
var counterHandler = new CounterHandler();
disruptor.HandleEventsWith(counterHandler);

var ringBuffer = disruptor.Start();


var sp = Stopwatch.StartNew();
while (sp.Elapsed.TotalSeconds < 10)
{
for (var i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
{
long sequenceNo = ringBuffer.Next();

ringBuffer[sequenceNo].Val = "test";

ringBuffer.Publish(sequenceNo);
}
}
Console.WriteLine("{0:#,#;;0} msgs in {1} for {2:#,#} ops/sec", counterHandler.Count, sp.Elapsed, (counterHandler.Count / sp.Elapsed.TotalSeconds));
}

And the resulting performance is:

29,791,996 msgs in 00:00:10.0003334 for 2,979,100 ops/sec

Now, I’ll be the first to agree that this is really and absolutely not even close to be a fair benchmark. It is testing wildly different things. Distruptor is using a ring buffer, and the BlockBuffer didn’t, and the original Bus implementation just used an unbounded queue.

But that is a very telling benchmark as well. Pretty much because it doesn’t matter. What I need this for is for network protocol handling. As such, even assuming that every single byte is a message, we would have to go far beyond what any reasonable pipe can be expected to be handle.

Do you pay to use your database? What if your database paid you? Learn more with RavenDB.

Topics:

Published at DZone with permission of

Opinions expressed by DZone contributors are their own.

{{ parent.title || parent.header.title}}

{{ parent.tldr }}

{{ parent.urlSource.name }}