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Multi-Threaded Programming With AWS Lambda

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Multi-Threaded Programming With AWS Lambda

If you're launching background tasks using AWS Lambda, you would do well to remember that it's not quite like a Java application.

· Cloud Zone ·
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Here's a simple multi-threaded program. Note that I use System.err to write messages rather than System.out: the latter is buffered, so that your output doesn't appear immediately; the former flushes output with every call.

public class MultithreadExperiment
{
    public static void main(String[] argv) throws Exception {
        new MultithreadExperiment().handler(new HashMap(), null);
    }

    public void handler(Map ignored, Context lambdaContext) {
        System.err.println("handler starting");
        new Thread(new BackgroundOperation()).start();
        System.err.println("handler finishing");
    }

    private static class BackgroundOperation implements Runnable {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            System.err.println("background thread starting: " + Thread.currentThread().getName());
            for (int ii = 0 ; ii < 10 ; ii++) {
                System.err.println("background thread running: " + Thread.currentThread().getName() + " at " + new Date());
                try {
                    Thread.sleep(1000);
                }
                catch (InterruptedException ex) {
                    System.err.println("background thread interrupted: " + Thread.currentThread().getName() + " at " + new Date());
                }
            }
        }
    }
}


When you run the program it spins up a background thread, which writes out a message every second. Since new threads are non-daemon by default, the program won't exit until this thread is finished. As a result, this is what you'll see for output:

handler starting
handler finishing
background thread starting: Thread-0
background thread running: Thread-0 at Mon Jan 07 18:18:59 EST 2019
background thread running: Thread-0 at Mon Jan 07 18:19:00 EST 2019
background thread running: Thread-0 at Mon Jan 07 18:19:01 EST 2019
background thread running: Thread-0 at Mon Jan 07 18:19:02 EST 2019
background thread running: Thread-0 at Mon Jan 07 18:19:03 EST 2019
background thread running: Thread-0 at Mon Jan 07 18:19:04 EST 2019
background thread running: Thread-0 at Mon Jan 07 18:19:05 EST 2019
background thread running: Thread-0 at Mon Jan 07 18:19:06 EST 2019
background thread running: Thread-0 at Mon Jan 07 18:19:07 EST 2019
background thread running: Thread-0 at Mon Jan 07 18:19:08 EST 2019


If we upload this program to AWS Lambda and run a test invocation, however, you see something completely different. Here's the output from CloudWatch Logs after the first invocation:

2019-01-08T00:15:39.957Z START RequestId: 87232aba-12da-11e9-8390-ed48849189e3 Version: $LATEST
2019-01-08T00:15:39.993Z handler starting
2019-01-08T00:15:39.993Z handler finishing
2019-01-08T00:15:39.994Z END RequestId: 87232aba-12da-11e9-8390-ed48849189e3
2019-01-08T00:15:39.994Z REPORT RequestId: 87232aba-12da-11e9-8390-ed48849189e3 Duration: 36.66 ms Billed Duration: 100 ms  Memory Size: 512 MB Max Memory Used: 42 MB 


No sign of the background thread. Let's invoke it again after a short wait:

2019-01-08T00:16:22.941Z START RequestId: a14450e0-12da-11e9-b18c-ed59274c4c08 Version: $LATEST
2019-01-08T00:16:22.944Z background thread starting: Thread-0
2019-01-08T00:16:22.949Z handler starting
2019-01-08T00:16:22.950Z background thread running: Thread-0 at Tue Jan 08 00:16:22 UTC 2019
2019-01-08T00:16:22.950Z handler finishing
2019-01-08T00:16:22.950Z background thread starting: Thread-1
2019-01-08T00:16:22.950Z background thread running: Thread-1 at Tue Jan 08 00:16:22 UTC 2019
2019-01-08T00:16:22.950Z END RequestId: a14450e0-12da-11e9-b18c-ed59274c4c08
2019-01-08T00:16:22.950Z REPORT RequestId: a14450e0-12da-11e9-b18c-ed59274c4c08 Duration: 2.92 ms Billed Duration: 100 ms  Memory Size: 512 MB Max Memory Used: 42 MB 


Here we see the output from two threads: Thread-0   was presumably started by the first invocation, while Thread-1   was started by the current invocation. Invoking it again:

2019-01-08T00:17:18.950Z START RequestId: c296963d-12da-11e9-855a-d106c9ec09c7 Version: $LATEST
2019-01-08T00:17:18.950Z background thread running: Thread-0 at Tue Jan 08 00:17:18 UTC 2019
2019-01-08T00:17:18.950Z background thread running: Thread-1 at Tue Jan 08 00:17:18 UTC 2019
2019-01-08T00:17:18.968Z handler starting
2019-01-08T00:17:18.969Z handler finishing
2019-01-08T00:17:18.969Z background thread starting: Thread-2
2019-01-08T00:17:18.969Z background thread running: Thread-2 at Tue Jan 08 00:17:18 UTC 2019
2019-01-08T00:17:18.969Z END RequestId: c296963d-12da-11e9-855a-d106c9ec09c7
2019-01-08T00:17:18.969Z REPORT RequestId: c296963d-12da-11e9-855a-d106c9ec09c7 Duration: 15.47 ms Billed Duration: 100 ms  Memory Size: 512 MB Max Memory Used: 42 MB 


We've got another thread starting, and output from the threads started by the previous invocations. What's really interesting is that the message from those threads shows the current time, which is nearly a minute later than the previous incoation. Clearly, we're not sleeping for only a single second. So what's happening?

The answer can be found in the documentation:

After a Lambda function is executed, AWS Lambda maintains the execution context for some time in anticipation of another Lambda function invocation. In effect, the service freezes the execution context after a Lambda function completes, and thaws the context for reuse, if AWS Lambda chooses to reuse the context [...]

While the documentation doesn't go into details, I think that it's safe to assume that Lambda uses the “cgroups freezer,” just like docker pause. The process still exists on the host system, but is completely suspended. When later unpaused, the background thread, like Rip Van Winkle, thinks that it's only been sleeping for a second.

But that doesn't completely explain why output from the first invocation appears in the logs for the second invocation. The answer for that is simple: it didn't have a chance to run.

Starting a thread is fast, but it's not instant. In my experiments with Lambda, it typically took between 0.1 and 0.150 milliseconds — although it occasionally took much longer. The handler function in this example only does one thing after starting the thread. True, it's a kernel call, with IO, but is probably less expensive than a thread start (indeed, in my experiments it took around 0.075 millis). Sometimes you'll get lucky, as shown in the second and third examples; sometimes (especially on cold start) you won't.

On the other hand, there's plenty of time for background threads to run when a lambda starts: as you can see from the log output, 10 to 30 milliseconds depending on whether it's a cold start or not. So in the second and third invocations, that's where you see the output from the threads started in previous invocations.

So what's the practical impact?

It means that you can't just “fire and forget” a background task in Lambda, like you can with a normal Java application. You have to use Thread.join() or some other coordination mechanism to ensure that the background task finishes before the handler function returns. If you don't, that task may never execute: there's no guarantee that Lambda container that was running it will ever be invoked again.

And if you're using a long-running background worker, such as a logging library that batches messages to reduce the number of web-service calls it makes? You (well, I) need to find a way to make those calls synchronous.

Topics:
java ,cloud ,aws ,lambda ,multi-threaded ,programming

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