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My Top 3 "No XML" Frameworks

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My Top 3 "No XML" Frameworks

· Java Zone
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Just released, a free O’Reilly book on Reactive Microsystems: The Evolution of Microservices at Scale. Brought to you in partnership with Lightbend.

I just reviewed my past projects and noticed that for about two years I've almost completely managed to get rid of XML configuration and deployment descriptors. It really works well, is efficient to develop, maintain, and test. I especially appreciated working with:
  1. Wicket (Apache's Web Framework, from conceptual point of view similar to JSF)
  2. Google's Guice  (I like especially the fluent configuration and only 22 pages of documentation)
  3. EJB 3 - No XML and just works.  EJB 3.1 would be even better.
  4. [JPA] it rocks but comes with very small XML-configuration - so it should be out of scope here.

Especially the integration between EJB 3 and Wicket and EJB 3 and Google's Guice are superb (I will write some more about that soon). I like JSF as well, however the amount of XML configuration is still huge. JSF was designed from the tool perspective, so it isn't a problem with a good tool (like NetBeans IDE or JDeveloper). ...already looking forward to JSF 2.0 :-).

From http://www.adam-bien.com/roller/abien/

Strategies and techniques for building scalable and resilient microservices to refactor a monolithic application step-by-step, a free O'Reilly book. Brought to you in partnership with Lightbend.

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