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MySQL Monitoring With Telegraf, InfluxDB, and Grafana

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MySQL Monitoring With Telegraf, InfluxDB, and Grafana

Setting up interactive, real-time, and dynamic dashboards to monitor your MySQL instances is probably easier than you think.

· Database Zone ·
Free Resource

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This post will walk you through each step of creating interactive, real-time, and dynamic dashboards to monitor your MySQL instances using Telegraf, InfluxDB, and Grafana.

Start by enabling the MySQL input plugin in /etc/telegraf/telegraf.conf:

[[inputs.mysql]]
  servers = ["root:root@tcp(localhost:3306)/?tls=false"]
  name_suffix = "_mysql"

[[outputs.influxdb]]
  database = "mysql_metrics"
  urls = ["http://localhost:8086"]
  namepass = ["*_mysql"]

Once Telegraf is up and running, it'll start collecting data and writing it to the InfluxDB database:

Finally, point your browser to your Grafana URL, then log in as the admin user. Choose Data Sources from the menu. Then, click Add new on the top bar.

Fill in the configuration details for the InfluxDB data source:

You can now import the dashboard.json file by opening the dashboard dropdown menu and clicking Import:

And that's it! You can check out my GitHub for more interactive and beautiful Grafana dashboards!

Databases should be easy to deploy, easy to use, and easy to scale. If you agree, you should check out CockroachDB, a scalable SQL database built for businesses of every size. Check it out here. 

Topics:
database ,database performance ,monitoring ,data visualization ,mysql ,influxdb ,grafana ,telegraf ,tutorial

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