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NuGet, OneGet and MyGet is YourGet


xavierdecoster.com - Using MyGet as a OneGet package source

At the Build conference, Microsoft announced the Windows Management Framework 5.0 Preview which includes Windows PowerShell 5.0, updates to the PowerShell ISE, Network Switch Cmdlets and ... OneGet!

What is OneGet?

OneGet a unified package management interface component with a set of managed and native APIs, a set of PowerShell cmdlets, and a WMI provider. The component accepts both Microsoft-provided and 3rd party-provided plugins which extend the functionality for a given package type.


As part of this Preview, OneGet is shipping with a prototype plugin compatible with Chocolatey, the so called ChocolateyProvider. This is a prototype implementation of a Chocolatey-compatible package manager that can install existing Chocolatey packages. This is a clear confirmation for the hard work done by the Chocolatey folks, and both systems will continue to evolve together, as Rob Reynolds explains in this post. If you want to follow-up on OneGet, then check out its GitHub repository and follow PSOneGet on Twitter.

Something about a forest and trees...

NuGet, MyGet, Chocolatey, OneGet... what?! People ask questions and occasionally can't see the forest for the trees. Here's a quick recap:

  • NuGet: a solution-level package management tool, used to manage software dependencies within the scope of a solution. It is accompanied by the NuGet Gallery, the home of many if not all .NET open source components.
  • Chocolatey: a system-level package management tool, used to manage software installations on a Windows system. It (currently) leverages PowerShell and NuGet, supports the Web Platform Installer (WebPI), MSI, RubyGems and many more, and is accompanied by the Chocolatey Gallery where you can find many popular software packages. Rob describes Chocolatey as somewhat like "apt-get", but with Windows in mind.
  • MyGet: a hosted NuGet package server where you can create and secure your own feeds. In essence, MyGet is able to host vanilla NuGet feeds, as well as Chocolatey feeds.
  • OneGet: a a unified interface to package management systems (see above)

So what does this mean? How do these package managers play along?

OneGet supports multiple package sources, and as stated earlier, OneGet comes with aChocolateyProvider. As MyGet also supports Chocolatey feeds, this effectively means that you can register a MyGet feed as a Chocolatey package source in OneGet! The below diagram is an attempt to illustrate how they relate:



How can I use a private OneGet package source?


This flow allows you to control what packages get distributed through OneGet, avoids the need to publish your internal software to the general public, and still allows you to leverage the great new scenarios that OneGet offers!

As usual, happy packaging! :)

I've still not played with OneGet yet... But I'm going to. Really. Any time now... um... yeah

Related Past Post XRef: 
PowerShell gets Chocolatey NuGet with OneGet 
Using NuGet doesn't mean you have to give it away... "Distributing .NET Licensed components using NuGet"


Published at DZone with permission of Greg Duncan, DZone MVB. See the original article here.

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