Over a million developers have joined DZone.
{{announcement.body}}
{{announcement.title}}

Performance analysis of Stored Procedures with PDO and PHP

DZone's Guide to

Performance analysis of Stored Procedures with PDO and PHP

· Web Dev Zone ·
Free Resource

Learn how error monitoring with Sentry closes the gap between the product team and your customers. With Sentry, you can focus on what you do best: building and scaling software that makes your users’ lives better.

Last week I had an interesting conversation on twitter about the usage of stored procedures in databases. Someone told stored procedure are evil. I’m not agree with that. Stored procedures are a great place to store business logic. In this post I’m going to test the performance of a small piece of code using stored procedures and using only PHP code.

Without stored procedures

// Without stored procedures
$time = microtime(TRUE);
$mem = memory_get_usage();

$dsn = 'pgsql:host=localhost;dbname=gonzalo;port=5432';
$user = 'user';
$password = 'password';
$conn = new PDO($dsn, $user, $password);
$conn->setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE, PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION);

$conn->beginTransaction();
$stmt = $conn->prepare('delete from web.tbltest');
$stmt->execute();

$stmt = $conn->prepare('INSERT INTO web.tbltest (field1) values (?)');
foreach (range(0,1000) as $i) {
    $stmt->execute(array($i));
}
$conn->commit();

print_r(array('memory' => (memory_get_usage() - $mem) / (1024 * 1024), 'seconds' => microtime(TRUE) - $time));

With stored procedures:

// With stored procedures:
/*
CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION web.method1()
  RETURNS numeric AS
$BODY$
BEGIN
   DELETE FROM web.tbltest;
   FOR i IN 0..1000 LOOP
     INSERT INTO web.tbltest (field1) values (i);
   END LOOP;
   RETURN 1;
END;
$BODY$
  LANGUAGE plpgsql VOLATILE
  COST 100;
*/
$time = microtime(TRUE);
$mem = memory_get_usage();

$dsn = 'pgsql:host=localhost;dbname=gonzalo;port=5432';
$user = 'user';
$password = 'password';
$conn = new PDO($dsn, $user, $password);
$conn->setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE, PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION);
$conn->beginTransaction();
$stmt = $conn->prepare('SELECT web.method1()');
$stmt->execute();
$stmt->setFetchMode(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC);
$out = $stmt->fetchAll();
$conn->commit();

print_r(array('memory' => (memory_get_usage() - $mem) / (1024 * 1024), 'seconds' => microtime(TRUE) - $time));

 

without stored procedures with stored procedures
memory: 0.0023880004882812
seconds: 0.31109309196472
memory: 0.0020713806152344
seconds: 0.065021991729736

So my conclusion: Stored procedures are not evil. The performance is really good. I know maybe it can be a bit mess if we place business logic within database and outside database at the same time, but with a good design and architecture this problem is easy to solve. What do you think?


What’s the best way to boost the efficiency of your product team and ship with confidence? Check out this ebook to learn how Sentry's real-time error monitoring helps developers stay in their workflow to fix bugs before the user even knows there’s a problem.

Topics:

Published at DZone with permission of

Opinions expressed by DZone contributors are their own.

{{ parent.title || parent.header.title}}

{{ parent.tldr }}

{{ parent.urlSource.name }}