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Quick JavaScript tip: trailing commas inside an object literal

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Quick JavaScript tip: trailing commas inside an object literal

· Web Dev Zone ·
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It used to be that some JavaScript engines weren’t picky about trailing commas inside an object literals, while others threw a syntax error. The ECMAScript 5 language specification [1] has made trailing commas legal, via the following syntax rule (in Sect. 11.1.5):

    ObjectLiteral :
        {}
        { PropertyNameAndValueList }
        { PropertyNameAndValueList , }
You can use this syntax in all modern browsers [3]. It makes it easier to maintain the content inside object literals, especially long ones: You don’t have to keep track which property is last when rearranging things. Take the following example.
    var obj = {
        foo: 123,
        bar: function () { ... },
    }
Thanks to the trailing comma, you save two steps when swapping foo and bar, as there is no need to add a comma after bar or to remove the comma after foo.

Related reading:

  1. Standard ECMA-262: ECMAScript Language Specification
  2. What’s new in ECMAScript 5
  3. ECMAScript 5 compatibility table

 

From http://www.2ality.com/2011/06/object-literal-comma.html

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