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Ramanujan Approximation for Circumference of an Ellipse

· Big Data Zone

There’s no elementary formula for the circumference of an ellipse, but there is an elementary approximation that is extremely accurate.

An ellipse has equation (x/a)² + (y/b)² = 1. If a = b, the ellipse reduces to a circle and the circumference is simply 2πa. But the general formula for circumference requires the hypergeometric function 2F1:

\setlength\arraycolsep{1pt} \pi (a + b) \, {}_2 F_1\left(\begin{matrix}-1/2& &-1/2 \\&1& \end{matrix}\middle;\lambda^2\right)

where λ = (a – b)/(a + b).

However, if the ellipse is anywhere near circular, the following approximation due to Ramanujan is extremely good:

\pi (a + b) \left(1 + \frac{3\lambda^2}{10 + \sqrt{4 - 3\lambda^2}}\right)

To quantify what we mean by extremely good, the error is O(λ10). When an ellipse is roughly circular, λ is fairly small, and the error is on the order of λ to the 10th power.

To illustrate the accuracy of the approximation, I tried the formula out on some planets. The error increases with ellipticity, so I took the most most elliptical orbit of a planet or object formerly known as a planet. That distinction belongs to Pluto, in which case λ = 0.016. If Pluto’s orbit were exactly elliptical, you could use Ramanujan’s approximation to find the circumference of its orbit with an error less than one micrometer.

Next I tried it on something with a much more elliptical orbit: Halley’s comet. Its orbit is nearly four times longer than it is wide. For Halley’s comet, λ = 0.59 and Ramanujan’s approximation agrees with the exact result to seven significant figures. The exact result is 11,464,319,022 km and the approximation is 11,464,316,437 km.

Here’s a video showing how elliptical the comet’s orbit is.

If you’d like to experiment with the approximation, here’s some Python code:

from scipy import pi, sqrt
from scipy.special import hyp2f1
def exact(a, b):
    t = ((a-b)/(a+b))**2
    return pi*(a+b)*hyp2f1(-0.5, -0.5, 1, t)
def approx(a, b):
    t = ((a-b)/(a+b))**2
    return pi*(a+b)*(1 + 3*t/(10 + sqrt(4 - 3*t)))
# Semimajor and semiminor axes for Halley's comet orbit
a = 2.667950e9 # km
b = 6.782819e8 # km
print exact(a, b)
print approx(a, b)

Published at DZone with permission of John Cook , DZone MVB .

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