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Review of Fujitsu’s IaaS Cloud API submission to DMTF

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Review of Fujitsu’s IaaS Cloud API submission to DMTF

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Things are heating up in the DMTF Cloud incubator. Back in September, VMWare submitted its vCloud API (or rather a “reader’s digest” version of it) to the group. Last week, the group released a white paper titled “Interoperable Clouds”. And a second submission, from Fujitsu, was made last week and publicly announced today.

The Fujitsu submission is called an “API design”. What this means is that it doesn’t tell you anything about what things look like on the wire. It could materialize as another “XML over HTTP” protocol (with or without SOAP wrapper), but it could just as well be implemented as a binary RPC protocol. It’s really more of an esquisse of a resource model than a remote API. The only invocation-related aspect of the document is that it defines explicit operations on various resources (though not their input and outputs). This suggest that the most obvious mapping would be to some XML/HTTP RPC protocol (SOAPy or not). In that sense, it stands out a bit from the more recent Cloud API proposals that take a “RESTful” rather than RPC approach. But in these days of enthusiastic REST-washing I am pretty sure a determined designer could produce a RESTful-looking (but contorted) set of resources that would channel the operations in the specification as HTTP-like verbs on these resources.

Since there are few protocol aspects to this “API design”, if we are to compare it to other “Cloud APIs”, it’s really the resource model that’s worth evaluating. The obvious comparison is to the EC2 model as it provides a pretty similar set of infrastructure resources (it’s entirely focused on the IaaS layer). It lacks EC2 capabilities around availability, security and monitoring. But it adds to the EC2 resource model the notions of VDC (”virtual data center”, a container of IaaS resources), VSYS (see below) and a lightly-defined EFM (Extended Function Module) concept which intends to encompass all kinds of network/security appliances (and presumably makes up for the lack of security groups).

The heart of the specification is the VSYS and its accompanying VSYS Descriptor. We are encouraged to think of the VSYS Descriptor as an extension of OVF that lets you specify this kind of environment:

Example content for a VSYS Descriptor

Example content for a VSYS Descriptor

By forcing the initial VSYS instance to be based on a VSYS Descriptor, but then allowing the VSYS to drift away from the descriptor via direct management actions, the specification takes a middle-of-the-road approach to the “model-based versus procedural” debate. Disciples of the procedural approach will presumably start from a very generic and unconstrained VSYS Descriptor and, from there, script their way to happiness. Model geeks will look for a way to keep the system configuration in sync with a VSYS Descriptor.

How this will work is completely undefined. There is supposed to be a getVSYSConfiguration() operation which “returns the configuration information on the VSYS” but there is no format/content proposed for the response payload. Is this supposed to return every single config file, every setting (OS, MW, application) on all the servers in the VSYS? Surely not. But what then is it supposed to return? The specification defines five VSYS attributes (VSYSID, creator, createTime, description and baseDescriptor) so I know what getSYSAttributes() returns. But leaving getVSYSConfiguration() undefined is like handing someone an airplane maintenance manual that simply reads “put the right part in the right place”. A similar feature is also left as an exercise to the reader in section that sketches an “external configuration service”. We are provided with a URL convention to address the service, but zero information about the format and content of the configuration instructions provided to the VServer.

EC2 has a keypair access mechanism for Linux instances and a clumsy password-retrieval system for Windows instances. The Fujitsu proposal adopts the lowest common denominator (actually the greatest common divisor, but that’s a lost rhetorical cause): random password generation/retrieval for everyone.

I also noticed the statement that a VServer must be “implemented as a virtual machine” which is an unnecessary constraint/assumption. The opposite statement is later made for EFMs, which “can be implemented in various ways (e.g. run on virtual machines or not)”, so I don’t want to read too much into the “hypervisor-required” VServer statement which probably just needs an editorial clean-up.

From a political perspective this specification looks more like a case of “can I play with you? I brought some marbles” than a more aggressive “listen everybody, we’re playing soccer now and I am the captain”. In other words, this may not be as much an attempt to shape the outcome of the incubator as much as to contribute to its work and position Fujitsu as a respected member whose participation needs to be acknowledged.

While this is an alternative submission to the vCloud API, I don’t think VMWare will feel very challenged by it. The specification’s core (VSYS Descriptor) intends to build on OVF, which should be music to VMWare’s ears (it’s the model, not the protocol, which is strategic). And it is light enough on technical details that it will be pretty easy for vCloud to claim that it, indeed, aligns with the intent of this “design”.

All in all, it is good to see companies take the time to write down what they expect out of the DMTF work. And it’s refreshing to see genuine single-company contributions rather than pre-negotiated documents by a clique. Whether they look more like implementable specifications of position paper, they all provide good input to the DMTF Cloud incubator.

Is iPaaS solving the right problems? Not knowing the fundamental difference between iPaaS and iPaaS+ could cost you down the road. Brought to you in partnership with Liaison Technologies.

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Published at DZone with permission of William Vambenepe. See the original article here.

Opinions expressed by DZone contributors are their own.

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