Over a million developers have joined DZone.
Platinum Partner

Running Drupal on Amazon EC2 LAMP Config with Serverless Puppet

· DevOps Zone

The DevOps Zone is brought to you in partnership with New Relic.  Download 5 Unsung Tools of DevOps to see which tools make the cut and why.

I’m currently working on a project that involves running Drupal on Amazon EC2. To save time in setting up future new VM instances, I decided to take the opportunity to learn puppet. For the time being, I’m using a single VM to run the full LAMP stack and running puppet without a server by copying my puppet manifest to the VM and using puppet’s apply command to apply it locally. However, this manifest can easily be adapted for a multi-VM environment. After some tinkering, I came up with the code below.

class web {
    package { 'httpd':
        ensure => 'present',
    }
 
    package { 'php':
        ensure => 'present',
    }
 
    # Update this to use your respective time zone value
    exec { 'php_config':
        command => '/bin/sed -i "s/^;date.timezone =/date.timezone = \'America\/Chicago\'/g" /etc/php.ini',
        require => Package['php'],
    }
 
    service { 'httpd':
        ensure => 'running',
        enable => true,
        hasrestart => true,
        hasstatus => true,
        subscribe => Package['httpd', 'php'],
    }
 
    # Drupal requirements start here
 
    package { 'php-pdo':
        ensure => 'present',
        require => Package['php'],
    }
 
    package { 'php-mysql':
        ensure => 'present',
        require => Package['php'],
    }
 
    package { 'php-xml':
        ensure => 'present',
        require => Package['php'],
    }
 
    package { 'php-gd':
        ensure => 'present',
        require => Package['php'],
    }
 
    package { 'php-mbstring':
        ensure => 'present',
        require => Package['php'],
    }
 
    # Drupal requirements end here
}
 
class mysql {
    package { 'mysql-server':
        ensure => 'present',
    }
 
    service { 'mysqld':
        ensure => 'running',
        enable => true,
        hasrestart => true,
        hasstatus => true,
        subscribe => Package['mysql-server'],
    }
 
    # Equivalent to /usr/bin/mysql_secure_installation without providing or setting a password
    exec { 'mysql_secure_installation':
        command => '/usr/bin/mysql -uroot -e "DELETE FROM mysql.user WHERE User=\'\'; DELETE FROM mysql.user WHERE User=\'root\' AND Host NOT IN (\'localhost\', \'127.0.0.1\', \'::1\'); DROP DATABASE IF EXISTS test; FLUSH PRIVILEGES;" mysql',
        require => Service['mysqld'],
    }
}
 
class {'web': }
class {'mysql': }

With this code saved to a file called manifest.pp (.pp being the file extension for puppet manifests), I can spin up a VM and do the following to set it up:

scp -i key.pem manifest.pp ec2-user@host:~/
ssh -i key.pem ec2-user@host
sudo yum upgrade -y
sudo yum install -y puppet
sudo puppet apply manifest.pp
rm -f manifest.pp
exit

At this point, I have a basic Apache/MySQL/PHP configuration capable of receiving a Drupal 7 installation.

Source:  http://matthewturland.com/2012/02/13/setting-up-ec2-for-drupal-with-puppet/

The DevOps Zone is brought to you in partnership with New Relic.  Read about where DevOps started and how the adoption rate went from tiny startups to giant Fortune 500 enterprises.

Topics:

{{ parent.title || parent.header.title}}

{{ parent.tldr }}

{{ parent.urlSource.name }}