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Servlet 4 Public Review Starts Now!

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Servlet 4 Public Review Starts Now!

Servlet 4 brings first-class, core standards based HTTP/2 support to the server-side Java ecosystem. Most changes in Servlet 4 should be transparent to developers.

· Java Zone
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Servlet 4 has just posted a public review (this is the last step before the proposed final specification). Servlet 4 is easily one of the most critical components of Java EE 8. The primary aim of Servlet 4 is to bring first-class, core standards based HTTP/2 support to the server-side Java ecosystem. Most of the changes in Servlet 4 (with the exception of things like the server push API) should be transparent to developers and are enforced in terms of requirements for Servlet 4 implementations to fully support HTTP/2. A decent resource to learn more about Servlet 4 and HTTP/2 should be my slide deck:

You can download and take a look at the draft specification itself from the JCP site. While this is essentially the final stretch for Servlet 4, below are some ways you can still engage; most of it comes directly from the Adopt-a-JSR page I drafted while still at Oracle. The Servlet 4 specification lead Ed Burns has also asked for specific help in testing out the server-push feature. His write-up is also a great introduction to the feature.

  • You can still join the specification itself as an expert or a contributor via the JCP page for the specification.
  • You can have your JUG officially support the standard through Adopt-a-JSR.
  • You can join the discussion without any ceremony by subscribing to the Servlet specification user alias.
  • You can share ideas and feedback by entering issues in the public issue tracker.
  • You can read the public review specification now.
  • You can try out the reference implementation now.
  • You can write or speak about Servlet 4 now.
  • You can encourage others to participate.

The next step is up to you. You can be a real part of Java's ongoing success. If you have any questions, I am happy to try to help- just drop me a note anytime.

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Topics:
http 2 ,servlet 4.0 ,java ee 8 ,java

Published at DZone with permission of Reza Rahman, DZone MVB. See the original article here.

Opinions expressed by DZone contributors are their own.

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