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The Singleton Class Explained

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The Singleton Class Explained

Understand three different ways to define the Singleton class in Java, and why one of them is preferred.

· Java Zone
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There are a handful of ways to define a Singleton class in Java. They aren’t that difficult, yet doing it the correct way matters. Here I have listed three ways of doing it. However, only the third, which uses an on-demand holder acronym is preferred as the singleton instance created here is thread-safe and unique.

Trivia 1: Why we don’t import classes like System, Integer and String?
Answer: The package java.lang.*; is implicitly imported.

Trivia 2: Can the main method of a Java program reside in an abstract class?
Answer: Yes it can! See the Driver class below.

1. Eager Singleton

package design.com.hamzeen;

public class EagerSingleton {

private static EagerSingleton ins = new EagerSingleton();

public static EagerSingleton getInstance() {
return ins;
}

private EagerSingleton() {
}
}

2. Lazy Singleton

package design.com.hamzeen;

public class LazySingleton {
private static LazySingleton ins;

public static LazySingleton getInstance() {
if (ins == null) {
ins = new LazySingleton();
}
return ins;
}

private LazySingleton() {
}
}

3. Singleton Holder

package design.com.hamzeen;

public class SingletonHolder {

public static SingletonHolder getInstance() {
return Holder.ins;
}

private final static class Holder {
private static final SingletonHolder ins = 
new SingletonHolder();
}

private SingletonHolder() {
}
}

The Driver and Output

package design.com.hamzeen;

public abstract class Driver {

public static void main(String[] args) {
EagerSingleton a1 = EagerSingleton.getInstance();
EagerSingleton a2 = EagerSingleton.getInstance();
System.out.println(a1.toString());
System.out.println(a2.toString());

LazySingleton b1 = LazySingleton.getInstance();
LazySingleton b2 = LazySingleton.getInstance();
System.out.println(b1.toString());
System.out.println(b2.toString());

SingletonHolder c1 = SingletonHolder.getInstance();
SingletonHolder c2 = SingletonHolder.getInstance();
System.out.println(c1.toString());
System.out.println(c2.toString());
}
}


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Topics:
java ,design pattens

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