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A small step for SCA, a giant leap for BSM

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A small step for SCA, a giant leap for BSM

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In a very short post, Khanderao Kand describes how configuration properties for BPEL processes in Oracle SOA Suite 11G are attached to SCA components. Here is the example he provides:

<component name="myBPELServiecComponent">
...
<property name="bpel.config.inMemoryOptimization">true</property>
</component>

 It doesn’t look like much. But it’s an major step for application-driven IT management (and eventually BSM).

Take a SCA component. Follow the SCA-defined component-to-composite and service-to-reference relationships upwards and eventually you’ll get to top level application services that have a decent chance of mapping well to business-relevant activities (e.g. order processing). Which means that the metrics of these services (e.g. availability, response time) are likely to be meaningful and important to the line of business. Follow the same SCA relationships downward and you’ll end up (in a SCA-based infrastructure like Oracle SOA Suite 11G), with target components that are meaningful to the IT administrator. Which means that their metrics and configuration settings (like “inMemoryOptimization”) are tracked and controlled by IT. You now have a direct string of connections between this configuration setting and a business relevant metric. You can navigate the connection in both directions: downward/reactive (”my service just went down, what changed in the infrastructure”) versus upward/proactive (”my service is always slow, what can I do to optimize the execution”).

Of course these examples are over-simplistic (and the title of this post is a bit too lyrical, on account of this). Following these SCA relationships in brute-force fashion will yield tens of thousands of low-level configuration settings for any top-level service, with widely differing importance and impact (not to mention that they interact). You need rules to make sense of this. Plus, configuration-based models are a complement to runtime transaction discovery, not a replacement (unless your model of the application includes every single line of code). But it’s not that often that you can see a missing link snap into place that clearly.

What this shows is the emergence of a common set of entities between the developer’s model and the IT admin model. And if the application was developed correctly, some of the entities in the developer’s model correspond to entities in the mental model of the application user and the line of business manager. SCA is the skeleton for this. Attaching configuration to SCA components puts muscle on the bone.

The road to BSM is paved with small improvements in the semantic alignment between IT infrastructure and application services. A couple of years ago, I tried to explain why SCA is very relevant for IT management. Now we can see it.

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Published at DZone with permission of William Vambenepe. See the original article here.

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