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Sonar Analysis Using Gradle

I’ve been experimenting with Gradle recently, and as part of the experiment, I wanted to get Sonar running and producing code metrics, including test coverage reports. I’m running the first release version of Gradle, so version 1.0.

To get Sonar working in Gradle you need to apply the sonar plugin, like this:

apply plugin: ‘sonar’

Then you need to add some sonar connection settings (very much like with Maven):

sonar {
server {
url = “http://${sonarBaseName}/”
}
database {
url = “jdbc:mysql://${hostBaseName}:3306/sonar?useUnicode=true&characterEncoding=utf8″
driverClassName = “com.mysql.jdbc.Driver”
username = “wibble”
password = “wobble”
}
}

To run the Sonar analysis/reports, you just call sonarAnalyze, which is the in-built task that the Sonar plugin gives you. So far, so easy.

The first problem was with the version of Sonar. My colleage Ed (check out his blog here) was trying to get a gradle build working with an existing Sonar installation, but wasn’t having much joy. We were using a version of Sonar pre version 2.8, so we had to upgrade. In the end we were forced to upgrade to version 3.0.1. That was the first pain point.

The next problem we stumbled upon was with cobertura. There’s a cobertura plugin for Gradle, and getting it to work is a bit unusual. You need to reference an initialisation script which is hosted on GitHub, like this:

buildscript {
apply from: ‘https://github.com/valkolovos/gradle_cobertura/raw/master/repo/gradle_cobertura/gradle_cobertura/1.2/coberturainit.gradle’
}

We had some problems with this. One day, I could access this script fine, and the next it failed. A week or so later, I could access it, but Ed’s build couldn’t. We still don’t understand why this was the case, but we suspect it was something to do with the GitHub https connection.

To make sure we didn’t get this problem again, we got hold of the initialisation script and saved it locally – unfortunately it has dependencies so we had to download the whole folder and put this in our artifactory repository, and make the build reference it from there. This seemed to fix our problem, but it left us with another issue – we were now depending on another build component, which contained hard coded build configuration information (the initialisation script refers to the maven central repo). We weren’t happy with this (since we use our own cached repositories in artifactory), so we had to think of a solution.

Ed went away to meditate on our problem. A little while later he came back with a gradle build file which used the Cobertura ant task. It’s pretty much the same way as it’s documented in the gradle cookbook, here.

These are the important parts that you need to include:

def cobSerFile="${project.buildDir}/cobertura.ser"
def srcOriginal="${sourceSets.main.classesDir}"
def srcCopy="${srcOriginal}-copy"
dependencies {
testRuntime 'net.sourceforge.cobertura:cobertura:1.9.3'
testCompile 'junit:junit:4.5'
}
test.doFirst  {
ant {
// delete data file for cobertura, otherwise coverage would be added
delete(file:cobSerFile, failonerror:false)
// delete copy of original classes
delete(dir: srcCopy, failonerror:false)
// import cobertura task, so it is available in the script
taskdef(resource:'tasks.properties', classpath: configurations.testRuntime.asPath)
// create copy (backup) of original class files
copy(todir: srcCopy) {
fileset(dir: srcOriginal)
}
// instrument the relevant classes in-place
'cobertura-instrument'(datafile:cobSerFile) {
fileset(dir: srcOriginal,
includes:"my/classes/**/*.class",
excludes:"**/*Test.class")
}
}
}
test {
// pass information on cobertura datafile to your testing framework
// see information below this code snippet
}
test.doLast {
if (new File(srcCopy).exists()) {
// replace instrumented classes with backup copy again
ant {
delete(file: srcOriginal)
move(file: srcCopy,
tofile: srcOriginal)
}
// create cobertura reports
ant.'cobertura-report'(destdir:"${project.buildDir.path}/reports/coverage",
format:'xml', srcdir:"src/main/java", datafile:cobSerFile)
ant.'cobertura-report'(destdir:"${project.buildDir.path}/reports/coverage",
format:'html', srcdir:"src/main/java", datafile:cobSerFile)
}
}

So this is how we’ve got it running at the moment. As you can see, we’re no longer using the Cobertura plugin for gradle. The next thing we need to do is get Sonar to pick up the Cobertura reports. This is configured in the Sonar configuration section. I’ve shown the Sonar configuration section at the top of this page, but now we need to make some changes to it, like this:

sonar{

project {
coberturaReportPath = new File(buildDir, “/reports/cobertura/coverage.xml”)
sourceEncoding = “UTF-8″
dynamicAnalysis = “reuseReports”
testReportPath = new File(buildDir, “/test-results”)
}

server {
url = “http://${sonarBaseName}/”
}
database {
url = “jdbc:mysql://${hostBaseName}:3306/sonar?useUnicode=true&characterEncoding=utf8″
driverClassName = “com.mysql.jdbc.Driver”
username = “wibble”
password = “wobble”
}
}

Now we need to go back and change the output directory of our Cobertura ant configuration, to make it output to /reports/cobertura/coverage.xml, so we change the last bit of our configuration to look like this:

// create cobertura reports

ant.'cobertura-report'(destdir:"${project.buildDir.path}/reports/cobertura/coverage",
format:'xml', srcdir:"src/main/java", datafile:cobSerFile)
ant.'cobertura-report'(destdir:"${project.buildDir.path}/reports/coverage",
format:'html', srcdir:"src/main/java", datafile:cobSerFile)

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