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Spark With H2O Using rsparkling and sparklyr in R

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Spark With H2O Using rsparkling and sparklyr in R

Once you've installed sparklyr and rsparkling, you can check out the working script, the code for testing the Spark context, and the code for launching H2O Flow.

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In order to work with Spark H2O using rsparkling and sparklyr in R, you must first ensure that you have both sparklyr and rsparkling installed.

Once you've done that, you can check out the working script, the code for testing the Spark context, and the code for launching H2O Flow. All of this information can be found below.

Here is the working script:

library(sparklyr)
> options(rsparkling.sparklingwater.version = “2.1.6”)
> Sys.setenv(SPARK_HOME=’/Users/avkashchauhan/tools/spark-2.1.0-bin-hadoop2.6′)
> library(rsparkling)
> spark_disconnect(sc)
> sc <- spark_connect(master = “local”, version = “2.1.0”)

Here is the code for testing the Spark context:

sc
$master
[1] “local[8]”

$method
[1] “shell”

$app_name
[1] “sparklyr”

$config
$config$sparklyr.cores.local
[1] 8

$config$spark.sql.shuffle.partitions.local
[1] 8

$config$spark.env.SPARK_LOCAL_IP.local
[1] “127.0.0.1”

$config$sparklyr.csv.embedded
[1] “^1.*”

$config$`sparklyr.shell.driver-class-path`
[1] “”

attr(,”config”)
[1] “default”
attr(,”file”)
[1] “/Library/Frameworks/R.framework/Versions/3.4/Resources/library/sparklyr/conf/config-template.yml”

$spark_home
[1] “/Volumes/OSxexT/tools/spark-2.1.0-bin-hadoop2.6”

$backend
A connection with
description “->localhost:53374”
class “sockconn”
mode “wb”
text “binary”
opened “opened”
can read “yes”
can write “yes”

$monitor
A connection with
description “->localhost:8880”
class “sockconn”
mode “rb”
text “binary”
opened “opened”
can read “yes”
can write “yes”

$output_file
[1] “/var/folders/x7/331tvwcd6p17jj9zdmhnkpyc0000gn/T//RtmpIIVL8I/file6ba7b454325_spark.log”

$spark_context
<jobj[5]>
class org.apache.spark.SparkContext
org.apache.spark.SparkContext@159ba51c
$java_context
<jobj[6]>
class org.apache.spark.api.java.JavaSparkContext
org.apache.spark.api.java.JavaSparkContext@6b114a2d
$hive_context
<jobj[9]>
class org.apache.spark.sql.SparkSession
org.apache.spark.sql.SparkSession@2cd7fdf8
attr(,”class”)
[1] “spark_connection” “spark_shell_connection” “DBIConnection”
> h2o_context(sc, st)
Error in is.H2OFrame(x) : object ‘st’ not found
> h2o_context(sc, strict_version_check = FALSE)
<jobj[15]>
class org.apache.spark.h2o.H2OContext
Sparkling Water Context:
* H2O name: sparkling-water-avkashchauhan_1672148412
* cluster size: 1
* list of used nodes:
(executorId, host, port)
————————
(driver,127.0.0.1,54321)
————————

Open H2O Flow in browser: http://127.0.0.1:54321 (CMD + click in Mac OSX)

Lastly, you can use the following command to launch H2O Flow:

h2o_flow(sc, strict_version_check = FALSE)

That's it — enjoy!

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Topics:
big data ,spark ,h2o ,rsparkling ,sparklyr ,r

Published at DZone with permission of Avkash Chauhan, DZone MVB. See the original article here.

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