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Spock and Roo: Easier Add-on Testing, Part 2

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Spock and Roo: Easier Add-on Testing, Part 2

· Java Zone ·
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Moving on to some more interesting tests. Given this method:

public boolean isInstalljQueryCommandAvailable() {
    String jsLocation = pathResolver.getFocusedIdentifier(
        Path.SRC_MAIN_WEBAPP, "/js");

    return fileManager.findMatchingAntPath(
        jsLocation + "**/jquery-1.*.min.js").isEmpty();
  }

I want to use Spock to test it. The challenge is the somewhat more nested set of objects. My add-on extends the AbstractOperations class (to get the embedded fileManager), so I need to mock that, plus mock the path resolver I've mounted with @Reference in my add-on as well.

To set it up I do this:

class JqueryuiOperationsImplTest extends spock.lang.Specification {

    JqueryuiOperationsImpl operations;

    def setup() {
        operations = new JqueryuiOperationsImpl();

        operations.pathResolver = Mock(PathResolver);
        operations.fileManager = Mock(FileManager);
    }

Spock mocks are similar to EasyMock, in that we then detail our assertions of what should happen before the test runs. In fact, based on a really interesting thread I found this AM while banging my head against the wall (don't do that, it hurts), if you put any mocking assertions in the when: part of a Spock test, it moves them to the setup: block. Anyway, here is my set of assertions:

def "isJqueryInstallAvailable called and happy path"() {

    setup:
    1* operations.pathResolver.getFocusedIdentifier(
            _, _) >> "src/main/webapp/js"

    1* operations.fileManager.findMatchingAntPath(
            _ as String) >> new TreeSet<FileDetails>()

I'm using Spock's matchers to eat the expressions - I don't really care what we pass to the getFocusedIdentifier or findMatchingAntPath methods, I just want them mocked and I want them to return values.

The >> is what tells us that we're stubbing the return output.

Here is the full test:

def "isJqueryInstallAvailable called and happy path"() {
    setup:
    1* operations.pathResolver.getFocusedIdentifier(
            _, _) >> "src/main/webapp/js"

    1* operations.fileManager.findMatchingAntPath(
            _ as String) >> new TreeSet<FileDetails>()

    when:
    def result = operations.isInstalljQueryCommandAvailable();

    then:
    result == true
}

Don't do what I did to get my head bruised. I originally wrote this:

1* operations.fileManager.findMatchingAntPath(
                _ as String).empty() >> false

I got my brain mixed up because I saw the line:

return fileManager.findMatchingAntPath(
    jsLocation + "**/jquery-1.*.min.js").isEmpty();

And that's going to throw a tasty NullPointerException because you're mocking the return of the method in fileManager, not the return statement! Oh, bother.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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