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Spring Boot for Microservices: The New Age Framework for Your Apps

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Spring Boot for Microservices: The New Age Framework for Your Apps

Here, we are going to explore the ways in which a DevOps team can leverage Springboot for the creation of excellent microservices.

· Microservices Zone ·
Free Resource

Microservices are those components of an app architecture that create a suite of systems. Many microservices combine as a suite to create a system that interacts through UIs (User Interfaces) with the users. Therefore, your application performance largely depends on microservices.

Springboot is an open-source framework based on the Java platform to create excellent microservices. It can help you build spring applications that can be used in the applications and are production-ready.

Here, we are going to explore the ways in which a DevOps team can leverage Springboot for the creation of excellent microservices.

What Are Microservices?

Microservices are architecture in your app that enables developers to develop several key services inside the app and deploy them independently. Each of these services has its own processes and they help the overall functionality of a business application.

Now that we have covered what is a microservice? Let’s get to Springboot!

To begin with, nowadays, every Java developer is familiar with Springboot and its independent capabilities.

Springboot itself is a stand-alone application ready for production, just like an unfinished part of an assembly line. We start with Springboot for dependency management.

Spring Boot: Dependency Management

It provides a set of dependencies for developers to manage dependencies of large projects. Some examples of the dependencies are:

Actuator Dependency

This dependency helps developers monitor the functionality and performance of apps. It also helps the developers manage the different functions of apps.

Code you can use for Springboot actuator dependency is:

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Security Dependency

This is a dependency added to the classpath. It automatically acquires basic authentication for all the needed HTTP endpoints. To add this dependency to your Springboot application, you need to add a security dependency as such:

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Web Dependency

A web dependency in Springboot uses several different servers like Spring MVC (Mobile-View-Controller), REST and Tomcat. It is a single Springboot dependency that can fetch all the needed dependencies for web development.

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Thyme Leaf Dependency

Springboot provides a java-based theme library called Thyme Leaf. It is used to create web-apps. If you are looking for mobile app development then Java can be your choice and then if its web-apps, this dependency can support XHTML/HTML5 for all your web-apps.  

Here, is an example of controller code created through Thyme Leaf dependency:

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package com.tutorialspoint.demo.controller
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import org.springframework.stereotype.Controller;
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import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
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@Controller
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public class WebController {
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   @RequestMapping(value = "/index")
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   public String index() {
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      return "index";
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   }
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}



Test Dependency

The Springboot dependency for app testing and web-app testing can be easy to use. It contains most of the elements required for conducting thorough testing. It also helps eliminate the need to configure and start an actual database for testing purposes through H2-DB databases.

Code for the dependency is:

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Springboot Auto Configuration

Springboot auto-configuration is quite helpful for DevOps in application development, deployment, and even continuous delivery. This is an automatically configured Spring application that is based on the JAR dependencies for all your project needs. 

Take an example of the MySQL database as your classpath, if you are not able to configure any database connection then your application’s performance will be affected due to database dependencies. To overcome this problem, Springboot comes with auto-configuration of an in-memory database.  

To use auto-configuration, a developer needs to use Auto-Configuration annotation to the main class file. As you do it, the application automatically gets auto-configured.

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import org.springframework.boot.SpringApplication;
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import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.EnableAutoConfiguration;
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@EnableAutoConfiguration
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public class DemoApplication {
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public static void main(String[] args) {
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SpringApplication.run(DemoApplication.class, args);
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}
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}


  

The Springboot Application

Any Springboot application has an entry point with a class that should contain an annotation — @SpringBootApplication. As you use the annotation, it should have a method that can run the Springboot application.

This method will include auto-configuration, component scan, and Springboot configuration. @SpringBootApplication includes all the annotations mentioned above and does not need separate initiation of each annotation like auto-configuration or component scan. 

Thus a single annotation can manage all the dependencies of Springboot application, ensuring complete dependency management.

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import org.springframework.boot.SpringApplication;
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import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.SpringBootApplication;
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@SpringBootApplication
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public class DemoApplication {
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public static void main(String[] args) {
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SpringApplication.run(DemoApplication.class, args);
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}
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}



Component Scan

As we saw with the auto-configuration annotation, it is different and independent annotation in a Springboot application and yet can be controlled through one annotation of the Springboot application alone.

As you initialize the application, Springboot will analyze all the components. It will scan all the beans associated with the application and other packages declarations. To initialize a component scan, you need to use @ComponentScan annotation for all the class files.

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import org.springframework.boot.SpringApplication;
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import org.springframework.context.annotation.ComponentScan;
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@ComponentScan
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public class DemoApplication {
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public static void main(String[] args) {
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SpringApplication.run(DemoApplication.class, args);
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}
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}



Signing Off

If you want to avoid XML configuration and reduce the development time. Springboot is the smart choice for you. Businesses around the world are looking for better productivity in DevOps and reduced development times. 

It becomes far more important for the development companies to come up with unique and innovative ways to build faster and high-performance apps. There are other options for a better build of apps like Gradle or Flutter. Springboot remains to be ideal. As it is easy to use and has the ability to increase productivity. 

Furthermore, Springboot with production-ready apps can help in prototyping and automated testing of the apps. Especially, testing microservices and app architecture against the user request can be gauged and more effective ways to render independent app functions can be achieved. So, if you are looking to reduce development time and cost, go for Springboot. 

Topics:
devops, frameworks, microservices, springboot, springbootapplication

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