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SpringSource listens: no restrictions on Spring current releases

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SpringSource listens: no restrictions on Spring current releases

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A few weeks ago, it looked like SpringSource were moving to a situation where Spring release tags over 3 months old (and builds) would only be available to those with commercial support agreements:

SpringSource and the Lost Tag
Q&A with Rod Johnson over Spring's maintenance policy change

Well, it looks like Rod Johnson (J-Rod?) and SpringSource have been monitoring the community reaction quite closely. On his blog, Rod has announce that based on the feedback (some pretty harsh), that they are amending the policy. From Rod's recent blog at:

A Question of Balance: Tuning the Maintenance Policy

are some reassuring statements such as:

We are amending our maintenance policy in the light of community feedback. We will make regular binary releases from the Spring trunk available to the community, with no 3 month window. For each version of Spring, releases will be available while it remains the trunk.

and also a statement regarding the open source licensing:

Let me take this opportunity once again to guarantee that Spring will remain open source for the community, under the current (Apache) license. Period.

(To be fair to Rod, though, SpringSource never wavered from the Apache license. I really don't know where that "meme" came from. I guess that's what the "once again" means)

So, my interpretation of the announcement is that SpringSource heard the reaction from the community, and decided to take their concerns into account. I know from e-mails I've had with Rod that he has been following the various reactions to the original announcement carefully, and that he passionately cares about what the community thinks. I say good on Rod and SpringSource for listening.

Spring is very high quality and Rod is trying to find a balance between running a company and producing high quality open source software. I guess initially, they got the balance wrong, but I feel quite happy that they have been listening and have moved to re-address this.

What do people think?

Andrew

p.s. I have no affiliation with SpringSource in any way. Use Spring.Net at work in an investment bank, and I know Rod from his pre-Spring days when we worked together on a commercial project.

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