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Strategy: Stop Using Linked-Lists

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While using java.util.LinkedHashMap every now and then, when I feel that the insertion order is relevant to subsequent entrySet iterations, I do not recall having used a LinkedList any time, recently. Of course, I understand its purpose and since Java 6, I apreciate the notion of a Deque type. But the LinkedList implementation of the List type hasn’t occurred to be useful to me very often.

Now, here’s an interesting summary about why linked lists can be very bad for your performance:
http://highscalability.com/blog/2013/5/22/strategy-stop-using-linked-lists.html

This summary is referring another, original article:
http://www.futurechips.org/thoughts-for-researchers/quick-post-linked-lists.html#more-818

While the “academic” advantage of a linked list is obvious to everyone (big-O advantage of insertion, removal operations), “real life” disadvantages related to hardware, memory, heap, might turn against you when using linked lists. What holds true in the C universe is probably not so wrong in the Java universe as well. Of course, such black/white articles should be read with caution...

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Published at DZone with permission of Lukas Eder, DZone MVB. See the original article here.

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