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The Web is Boring

Sorry, web, but you bore me.

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When I was growing up, flying was fun. This wasn’t the kind of fun that a kid finds in simply new experiences - it was a legitimately enjoyable experience. The airport was a much less stressful place than it is today, with far less security and fewer lines. The planes seemed more spacious (though perhaps that part was really just that I was a kid). They served you food on most flights - with a real, metal fork and knife. Perhaps it wasn’t the greatest food, but wouldn’t we just love to get something, anything, nowadays? They’d even let kids go into the cabin and meet the crew, often handing them a junior crew member pin to wear.

twa pin

I fly more nowadays than I did back then, but flying is generally painful. The airport is stressful. The airline customer service is generally awful. There are few, if any, meals or snacks served. Flying has become something I need - for work, to visit family, to get to somewhere for vacation - not something I enjoy. Even on vacation, flying is something we power through to get where we want to be rather than being part of the vacation experience.

The Web, Too, Has Lost Its Luster

Much like the joy of flying, I am finally ready to openly admit that the web is no longer fun. Just like flying, I use it more today than I ever did back when it was fun, but it is purely out of necessity rather than desire. On a personal level, I use web sites to get news and to keep up with friends and family. The web is, obviously, an integral part of my work too, for news and information as well as the focus of my actual job. All of these things I need, but none of them bring the joy and exitement that the web used to bring.

Perhaps you are not old enough to remember when the web was fun. If so, you may even think that it is fun. But back in the mid-to-late-90s, the web had the power to amaze us. New sites and new businesses would launch regularly and everyone had to try them out because each one seemed to bring something new and creative to the table. Sure, many didn’t survive long (and we had tons of useless accounts), but they all seemed to be part of an inexorable path towards something special - a future where the web would make our lives more enjoyable, easier and, yes, more fun. Many of us firmly believed that the web was the future of computing - who’d need a desktop or operating system when the web was eventually going to replace the need for either.

That Didn’t Happen

Let’s be honest. None of that ever happened. You may be thinking, “But what about my streaming movies or my streaming music or my multiplayer games? Aren’t those fun?” To which I’d say, “Don’t confuse the internet with the web.” The internet enables each of these, but they are rarely done via the web (yes, they all have web interfaces, but I’d bet the majority of people do not access them this way).

There’s been a lot of talk about how the web is losing some unofficial battle for survival. Much of that has focused on the overwhelming amount of tools for web development and the way these tools are impacting the performance of the web. I am not disagreeing with those, per se, but I can say that the web was actually much more fun back when it was also horribly slow (most of us were on dial-up after all).

I feel that the thing holding the web back is a lack of real, creative innovation. I read every day about new little features of the web platform, but I can’t remember the last time I read about something built on the web that really excited me. Until then, I’ll keep passionlessly reading my news and blog posts or getting my gmail and hating myself for checking Facebook for lack of something more interesting to do. Sorry, web, but you bore me.

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Published at DZone with permission of Brian Rinaldi, DZone MVB. See the original article here.

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