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Tip: Show/Hide System Tray in Windows Phone 7

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Tip: Show/Hide System Tray in Windows Phone 7

· Mobile Zone
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System Tray

System Tray is the small tiny bar across the top of the Phone screen. It displays in Portrait mode. When your application is set in Portrait mode, the height of the System Tray becomes 32 pixel and when the application is set in Landscape mode, the width of the System Tray becomes 72 pixel. This is as per the UI Design Guidelines and Interaction Guideline of Windows Phone 7.

It is not good way to hide the System Tray as it displays various important information to the user. But in some case, you may want to hide the System Tray.

Demonstration of Show/Hide

To start with the code, let us design our page with a CheckBox inside it. This will fire the event to show or hide the System Tray. We will add a CheckBox in the page to show or hide the System Tray. Here is the XAML code for your reference:

 
<Grid x:Name="ContentPanel" Grid.Row="1" Margin="12,0,12,0" VerticalAlignment="Top">
    <CheckBox Content="Show System Tray" Checked="ShowSystemTray" Unchecked="HideSystemTray"/>
</Grid>

Here is the code implementation:

 
private void ShowSystemTray(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    SystemTray.IsVisible = true;
}
 
private void HideSystemTray(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    SystemTray.IsVisible = false;
}
 

When the “Show System Tray” is checked, you will see the System Tray bar at the top of the screen as shown in the first figure below:

Show System Tray                      Hide System Tray

Uncheck the “Show System Tray”. This will hide the System Tray bar from the screen. Hope, this tip was helpful for you to understand it clearly.

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Published at DZone with permission of Kunal Chowdhury, DZone MVB. See the original article here.

Opinions expressed by DZone contributors are their own.

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