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Too Many Objects

· DevOps Zone

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Around 1990, object oriented programming (OOP) was all the buzz. I was curious what the term meant and had a hard time finding a good definition. I still remember a description I saw somewhere that went something like this:

Object oriented programming is a way of organizing large programs. … Unless your program is fairly large, you will not see any difference between object oriented and structured programming.

The second sentence is no longer true. OOP is not just a high-level organizational style. Objects and method calls now permeate software at the lowest level. And that’s where things went wrong. Software developers got the idea that if objects are good, more objects are better. Everything should be an object!

For example, I had a discussion with a colleague once on how to represent depth in an oil well for software we were writing. I said “Let’s just use a number.”

double depth;

My suggestion was laughed off as hopelessly crude. We need to create depth objects! And not just C++ objects, COM objects! We couldn’t send a double out into the world without first wrapping it in the overhead of an object.

Languages like C# and Java enforce the everything-is-an-object paradigm. You can’t just write a function; you have to write member functions of an object. This leads to a proliferation of “-er” classes that do nothing but wrap a function. For example, suppose you need a function to solve a quadratic equation. You might make it the Solve method on a QuadraticEquationSolver object. That’s just silly. As John Carmack said,

Sometimes, the elegant implementation is a function. Not a method. Not a class. Not a framework. Just a function.

Languages are changing. You can create anonymous functions in C#, for example. You can even create a named function, by creating an anonymous function first and saving it to a named variable. A little wonky, but not too bad.

I imagine when people say OOP is terrible, they often mean that OOP as commonly practiced now goes too far.

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Published at DZone with permission of John Cook , DZone MVB .

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