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Top 20 Cloud Computing Service Providers

DZone 's Guide to

Top 20 Cloud Computing Service Providers

Take a look at some of the largest companies with cloud clout.

· Cloud Zone ·
Free Resource

Cloud computing companies are sprouting up faster than flowers in springtime. The surest sign of a new industry is a plethora of startups, and that is certainly the case in the cloud computing industry. But after cloud computing’s first decade, there are two distinctly different truths – regardless of whether you’re talking about public, private, or hybrid cloud offerings.

First, the inevitable consolidation has not taken place. Sure, big firms have snapped up small players, but many cloud startups are still in growth mode and not looking to be bought. Second, the presence of old-school tech giants in cloud computing. Established firms are often the last to embrace a technology, or at least very late to it. They are so enamored to their current business model that there is no room for embracing a new one – or they fear the new model because it could disrupt their current business.

Top Cloud Service Providers

Here is the list of top 20 cloud service providers that are best if you want to dive into the cloud services.

  • Adobe: Long the standard for artistic and creative people, Adobe has shifted many of its products that were installed on PCs to the cloud in the form of SaaS offerings. It offers three services, the Creative Cloud, the Marketing Cloud, and the Document Cloud.
  • Zendesk: Zendesk offers a cloud service that handles an enterprise’s technical and customer support and can more easily be integrated into a company’s business than setting up their own help desk. It provides self-serve portals for customer support, live support, and voice support.
  • Apigee: Apigee is all about making APIs available for developers. The API console helps developers learn and work with APIs. It sells its Apigee Enterprise platform to enterprise API providers for functions such as API analytics, developer portal and keys, API rate limiting and traffic shaping, API transformations and performance monitoring.
  • AT&T: The telecom giant is making good on its commitment to deploy state-of-the-art infrastructure across its network and data centers. AT&T is working with Juniper Networks to deploy software-defined networking and is making a serious play for the Internet of Things market, leveraging its substantial connectivity assets.
  • Zoho: One of the pioneers in SaaS, its Creator platform allows for building and publishing online database applications with just a simple drag-and-drop platform. Zoho Creator helps you build custom Web and mobile applications, automate workflows and generates customized analytics reports.
  • CSC: The consulting giant provides both private and hybrid cloud management solutions. Its flagship product is the CSC Agility Platform, which offers management, governance, and security across multiple public and private clouds.
  • NetSuite Salesforce: For the little guy – but clearly possessing a high profile among its user base. NetSuite offers cloud-based ERP, CRM and e-commerce applications for small- to mid-sized businesses. It has been acquired by Oracle.
  • SAP: SAP’s cloud offering is built around its HANA in-memory technology providing SaaS for a line of business apps, PaaS for a cloud platform, and IaaS for an on-demand infrastructure. All services are available from public, hybrid, and private clouds.
  • CenturyLink: CenturyLink, Inc. (stylized as CenturyLink) is an American telecommunications company, headquartered in Monroe, Louisiana, that provides communications and data services to residential, business, governmental, and wholesale customers in 37 states. A member of the S&P 500 index, the company operates as a local exchange carrier and Internet access provider in U.S. markets and is the third-largest telecommunications company in the United States in terms of lines served, behind AT&T and Verizon. It also provides long distance service with 55 data centers around the country.
  • Verizon: Verizon Enterprise Solutions is a division of Verizon Communications based in Basking Ridge, New Jersey that provides services and products for Verizon’s business and government clients around the world. It was formed as Verizon Business in January 2006 and relaunched as Verizon Enterprise Solutions on January 1, 2012. Between April 2014 and October 2016 its president was Chris Formant. Since November 2016, George J. Fischer has been Verizon Enterprise Solution’s President. Verizon tried to get into the enterprise cloud market after the acquisition of Terremark, but is unloading that business now to work on helping customers move legacy services to other clouds, like Amazon and Microsoft. It is also looking to be the connection provider between cloud services and data centers.
  • OpenNebula: OpenNebula is a cloud computing platform for managing heterogeneous distributed data center infrastructures. The OpenNebula platform manages a data center’s virtual infrastructure to build private, public and hybrid implementations of infrastructure as a service. OpenNebula touts itself as an offering in the “open cloud.” That is, it’s enterprise-grade open source cloud management. In essence, it’s a form of data center virtualization, an extensible layer to help you orchestrate your company’s cloud infrastructure.
  • Apache Software Foundation: The Apache Software Foundation (ASF) is an American non-profit corporation (classified as in the United States) to support Apache software projects, including the Apache HTTP Server. The ASF was formed from the Apache Group and incorporated in Delaware, U.S., in June 1999. It’s not a company and has no employees, but no list of significant cloud companies would be complete without the Apache Foundation, whose work basically drives the Internet at large, including cloud computing, Hadoop for Big Data, and other key applications.
  • Red Hat: Red Hat, Inc. is an American multinational software company providing open-source software products to the enterprise community. Founded in 1993, Red Hat has its corporate headquarters in Raleigh, North Carolina, with satellite offices worldwide. Red Hat has become associated to a large extent with its enterprise operating system Red Hat Enterprise Linux and with the acquisition of open-source enterprise middleware vendor JBoss. Red Hat also offers Red Hat Virtualization (RHV), an enterprise virtualization product. Red Hat provides storage, operating system platforms, middleware, applications, management products, and support, training, and consulting services.
  • Google Cloud Platform: Google Cloud Platform is a cloud service provider by Google that offers hosting on the same supporting infrastructure that Google uses internally for end-user products like Google Search and YouTube. Cloud Platform provides developer products to build a range of programs from simple websites to complex applications. Google Cloud Platform is a part of a suite of enterprise services from Google Cloud and provides a set of modular cloud-based services with a host of development tools. For example, hosting and computing, cloud storage, data storage, translations APIs and Prediction APIs.
  • IBM: IBM cloud computing is a set of cloud computing services for business offered by the information technology company IBM. IBM cloud includes infrastructure as a service (IaaS), software as a service (SaaS) and platform as a service (PaaS) offered through public, private and hybrid cloud delivery models, in addition to the components that make up those clouds.
  • HP Enterprise: HP Cloud is a set of cloud computing services available from Hewlett-Packard (HP) that offered public cloud, private cloud, hybrid cloud, managed a private cloud, and other cloud services. It was the combination of the previous HP Converged Cloud business unit and HP Cloud Services, which is the OpenStack technology-based public cloud. It is used by enterprise organizations so they can combine public cloud services with their own internal IT resources to create hybrid clouds, or a mix of different cloud computing environments made up of private and public clouds.
  • VMware: VMware, Inc. is a subsidiary of Dell Technologies that provides cloud and virtualization software and services and claims to be the first to successfully virtualize the x86 architecture commercially. Founded in 1998, VMware is based in Palo Alto, California. In 2004, it was acquired by and became a subsidiary of EMC Corporation, then on August 14, 2007, EMC sold 15% of the company in a New York Stock Exchange IPO. The company trades under the abreviation VMW. VMware’s desktop software runs on Microsoft Windows, Linux, and macOS, while its enterprise software hypervisors for servers, VMware ESX, and VMware ESXi, are bare metal hypervisors that run directly on server hardware without requiring an additional underlying operating system. The vCloud Air public cloud service offers three services: data center extension, disaster recovery, and data center replacement. VMware’s leadership in data center virtualization provides it with a high profile among enterprise customers.
  • Pivotal: The software was originally developed by VMware and then transferred to Pivotal Software, a joint venture by EMC, VMware, and General Electric. In January 2015, the Cloud Foundry Foundation was created as an independent not-for-profit 501. Linux Foundation Collaborative Project Pivotal, a spin-off of EMC and VMware, offers Cloud Foundry, a PaaS service that offers a new way to build and deploy software rapidly and update it based on customer feedback. Pivotal also offers training to customers to build apps and offered analytics tools as well.
  • Oracle: Oracle Cloud is the industry’s broadest and most integrated public cloud. It offers best-in-class services across software as a service (SaaS), platform as a service (PaaS), and infrastructure as a service (IaaS), and even lets you put Oracle Cloud in your own data center. The on-premises software giant has heavily leveraged its offerings into SaaS, PaaS and IaaS offerings, including middleware, database, Java, security and identity-management services that enable integrating legacy systems with cloud systems. Deep pockets and willing to invest in the cloud.
  • Cisco Systems: Cisco Systems, Inc. (known as Cisco) is an American multinational technology conglomerate headquartered in San José, California, in the center of Silicon Valley, that develops, manufactures, and sells networking hardware, telecommunications equipment, and other high-technology services and products. Through its numerous acquired subsidiaries, such as OpenDNS, WebEx, and Jasper, Cisco specializes in specific tech markets, such as the Internet of Things (IoT), domain security, and energy management. With networking gear sales slowing, Cisco has pivoted to a cloud-of-clouds strategy with its Intercloud ecosystem. It launched the Intercloud service in 2014 designed to offer enterprise-class cloud IT services with two major components. The Intercloud Fabric enables workload portability and Application Centric Infrastructure (ACI) software for automatically provisioning of resources.

Thanks for reading, If you are looking for some Cloud computing questions Check out this post 

21 Best Cloud Computing Interview Questions




Topics:
cloud ,cloud vendor ,paas ,saas ,cloud provider

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