Over a million developers have joined DZone.
{{announcement.body}}
{{announcement.title}}

Unit and Integration are Ambiguous Names for Tests

DZone's Guide to

Unit and Integration are Ambiguous Names for Tests

Learn better definitions for unit and integration tests based on Simon Brown's C4 architecture model and end the ambiguity. Share your thoughts as well.

· Agile Zone
Free Resource

See how three solutions work together to help your teams have the tools they need to deliver quality software quickly. Brought to you in partnership with CA Technologies

I've blogged about architecturally-aligned testing before, which essentially says that our automated tests should be aligned with the constructs that we use to describe a software system. I want to expand upon this topic and clarify a few things, but first...

Why?

In a nutshell, I think the terms "unit test" and "integration test" are ambiguous and open to interpretation. We tend to all have our own definition, but I've seen those definitions vary wildly, which again highlights that our industry often lacks a shared vocabulary. What is a "unit"? How big is a "unit"? And what does an "integration test" test the integration of? Are we integrating components? Or are we integrating our system with the database? The Wikipedia page for unit testing talks about individual classes or methods ... and that's good, so why don't we use a much more precise terminology instead that explicitly specifies the scope of the test?

Align the names of the tests with the things they are testing

I won't pretend to have all of the answers here, but aligning the names of the tests with the things they are testing seems to be a good starting point. And if you have a nicely defined way of describing your software system, the names for those tests fall into place really easily. Again, this comes back to creating that shared vocabulary - a ubiquitous language for describing the structures at different levels of abstraction within a software system.

Here are some example test definitions for a software system written in Java or C#, based upon my C4 model (a software system is made up of containers, containers contain components, and components are made up of classes).

Name What? Test scope? Mocking, stubbing, etc? Lines of production code tested per test case? Speed
Class tests Tests focused on individual classes, often by mocking out dependencies. These are typically referred to as “unit” tests. A single class - one method at a time, with multiple test cases to test each path through the method if needed. Yes; classes that represent service providers (time, random numbers, key generators, non-deterministic behaviour, etc), interactions with “external” services via inter-process communication (e.g. databases, messaging systems, file systems, other infrastructure services, etc ... the adapters in a “ports and adapters” architecture). Tens Very fast running; test cases typically execute against resources in memory.
Component tests Tests focused on components/services through their public interface. These are typically referred to as “integration” tests and include interactions with “external” services (e.g. databases, file systems, etc). See also ComponentTeston Martin Fowler's bliki. A component or service - one operation at a time, with multiple test cases to test each path through the operation if needed. Yes; other components. Hundreds Slightly slower; component tests may incur network hops to span containers (e.g. JVM to database).
System tests UI, API, functional and acceptance tests (“end-to-end” tests; from the outside-in). See alsoBroadStackTest on Martin Fowler's bliki. A single scenario, use case, user story, feature, etc across a whole software system. Not usually, although perhaps other systems if necessary. Thousands Slower still; a single test case may require an execution path through multiple containers (e.g. web browser to web server to database).

Thoughts?

This definition of the tests doesn't say anything about TDD, when you write your tests and how many tests you should write. That's all interesting, but it's independent to the topic we're discussing here. So then, do *you* have a good clear definition of what "unit testing" means? Do your colleagues at work agree? Can you say the same for "integration testing"? What do you think about aligning the names of the tests with the things they are testing? Thoughts?

Discover how TDM Is Essential To Achieving Quality At Speed For Agile, DevOps, And Continuous Delivery. Brought to you in partnership with CA Technologies

Topics:
java ,architecture ,testing

Published at DZone with permission of Simon Brown, DZone MVB. See the original article here.

Opinions expressed by DZone contributors are their own.

{{ parent.title || parent.header.title}}

{{ parent.tldr }}

{{ parent.urlSource.name }}