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Unit Testing in AEM (Thinking Out Loud)

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This is not a recommendation of any sorts but a culmination of ideas and a few options that are available for us to use if we want to do unit testing within AEM. I had done some research for a client some time back and this article is largely influenced by that work but a lot of contextual stuff has been pulled out. I have still tried my best to ensure that the article here holds it’s essence. I will try to do a follow-up soon with a lot more details.

Option 1: Use Sling tools and test in-container

Apache sling has released a set of tools http://sling.apache.org/documentation/development/sling-testing-tools.html which can assist unit testing in the application. There tools offer several ways of doing the testing like a) good old JUnits where there are no external dependencies or b) Use of mocks – sling provides readymade mocks which reduce the effort or c) we can deploy the test cases in a CQ box (or sling) and run using OSGi references.

The approach I am recommending here is where we will deploy JUnits in an already hosted CQ instances and invoke the test cases remotely. I understand that this is not “old school unit testing as i am not abstracting any dependencies and my units include dependencies” but i have a reason for doing that. As a matter of fact if you have been following up my writings on unit testing you would know that I am not a big fan of mocking and actually am very happy to do any unit testing against dependencies if i can set it up.

 To do this we need a few things to happen as follows:

  1. We will need to have a hosted CQ instance that can be used as a container for running test cases
    1. We can use embedded systems but then we will have to spend additional effort creating content and what not. Also the embedded container will be sling and not CQ and we would like to keep the environment as close to what we use as possible
  2. The CQ instance should have a pre-populated set of products and images (this setup does uses AEM eCommerce module and PIM and DAM have been integrated with external systems) and that acts for us as readymade test data. These can be achieved using our backend integrations. We can chose to do it independently or can do it automatically (automation of these things can also happen over time to allow us to start quickly)
  3. For interactions with any backend services (like Order Management, Pricing, Account information), we would need to have a backend service instance running (as i said i prefer systems over mocks if possible) with all the variables and pieces setup. This instance should also have various data setup like user accounts, products instances, availability, prices, etc to ensure our use cases work. There are obvious challenges setting up independent backend services and we can explore one of the following 2 options
    1. Capture all requests and responses for a certain request type and serialize those into a test-data store. It can be a huge XML that we can store in a key-value pair sort of a system – can be a database like mongo (even SQL would do) or we can serialize on file system or;
    2. We can use an already existing backend system

Option 2: Use selenium as the functional testing tool

In this approach I am recommending not to use JUnits at all. The idea is to use the philosophy of system testing which can test all of your units in the code. This is a big departure from the traditional way of unit testing where all dependencies are mocked out, and we can run several tests quickly. While Option 1 is also to the same effect, in this approach we go a step further and leverage our system test suits. The idea is not to do this for every single use case, but pick up business critical functions like checkouts, order management, account management and automate those. The selenium scripts can then be integrated with a JUnit runner where we can then integrate it with CI tools and can run it from Eclipse or Maven and hence can be integrated with CI itself. This saves us the time to write those JUnits and manages a whole suite independently. This approach also needs a hosted CQ instance with product data setup, some content setups, and backend integrations just like in Option 1.

Of course this is bit tricky and not really unit testing but it has some huge upsides if done right.

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Published at DZone with permission of Kapil Viren Ahuja, DZone MVB. See the original article here.

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