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When Is The Cloud Not A Cloud?

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Sometimes I joke that as my kids grow up they won’t see clouds, they’ll just see air—meaning of course that their use of cloud-based services will become so ubiquitous as to make the cloud moniker largely unnecessary. What we so enthusiastically label cloud will just be the way everyone builds and deploys their apps. “Nothing to see here folks; but look at my wonderful new application…”

We won’t arrive at this future until we strip the word cloud of its power. And to do this, we need to go after the things we thought made cloud unique and special in the first place. Today, Amazon took a vicious swipe at the canonical definition by introducing dedicated EC2 instances. Dedicating hardware to a single customer addresses the next logical layer in the hierarchy of security concerns after virtual isolation. Amazon’s VPC product, introduced back in August 2009, provided virtualized isolation in their multi-tenant environment. Essentially VPC is like a virtual zone housing only your instances. This zone is tied back to your on-premise network using a VPN. The only way in or out of a zone is through your corporate network. Other Amazon-resident applications can not access your apps directly—in fact, any external app, Amazon-resident or otherwise—must go through your conventional corporate security perimeter and route back to Amazon over the VPN to be able to gain access to a VPC app. The real value of VPC is that it puts instance access back into the hands of the corporate security group.

The problem that the highly security conscious organization has with VPC is that the “V” is for virtual. VPC may implement clever isolation tricks using dynamic VLANs and hypervisor magic known only to a gifted few, but when your critical application loads up you may actually reside on exactly the same hardware as your own worst enemy. In theory, neither of you can exploit this situation. But you need to believe the theory. Completely.

Today’s announcement means that Amazon’s customers can literally have exclusive use of hardware. This is good news for anyone with reservations about hypervisor isolation. However, the networking remains virtualized, and of course you can still ask the classic cloud security questions about where data resides, or the background of the staff running the infrastructure. So a mini-private cloud, it is not; but dedicated instances is an interesting offering, nonetheless.

What is more intriguing is that by providing dedicated hardware, Amazon is beginning to erode one of the basic foundations of the canonical cloud definition: multi-tenancy. Purists will argue—as they do so with unexpected vehemence with regard to private cloud—that what Amazon is offering is not a cloud at all, but in fact a retrograde step back to simple hosting or co-loc. I’m inclined to disagree, however, and think instead Amazon offers a logical next step (and certainly not the last) in the evolution of cloud services. By doing so, Amazon amplifies some of the other important aspects that define what the cloud really is. Things like self-service, a greatly changed division and scope of operational responsibility, the leverage of commodity of scale, elasticity, and the ability to pay for what you actually use.

I don’t think Amazon’s new offering will be wildly successful because it still leaves many security issues unresolved. But I do think it points the way to the future cloud, which will have many different attributes and characteristics that solve different problems. Some may conflict with traditional definitions and expectations. Some may fulfill them. What is important is to choose the service that meets your needs, and don’t worry what it’s called. That’s marketing’s problem.

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Published at DZone with permission of Scott Morrison . See the original article here.

Opinions expressed by DZone contributors are their own.

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