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Yes, I'd Like Some Linux With My Dell

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Yes, I'd Like Some Linux With My Dell

Guess what? Dell is offering Linux (Ubuntu 7.04, to be precise) on their systems! The move continues a general trend toward open source technologies.

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In blow to Microsoft, Dell will pre-install rival products on its PCs after receiving a flood of requests from users

Dell is moving forward with plans to sell computers pre-installed with Linux, the “open-source” operating system that competes with Microsoft’s dominant Windows.

The world’s second-largest PC maker has chosen the Ubuntu 7.04 version of Linux, codenamed Feisty Fawn, after receiving a flood of requests for the option to choose the software when it asked consumers for suggestions on a new website called IdeaStorm.

Dell’s decision to ship Linux is a blow to Microsoft, the world’s largest software maker, which makes the lion’s share of its profits from Windows. Open source projects make the computer code behind their software freely available, but they can charge for support services. In contrast, groups such as Microsoft charge a license fee to use the computer code itself.

Perhaps the best-known open source product, Mozilla’s Firefox Internet browser, has been steadily chipping away at the lead of Microsoft’s Internet Explorer and now accounts for as much as 25 percent of the market in some territories.

However, Dell’s move to Linux also signals a switch in tactics from the embattled computer maker as it strives to regain market share lost to Hewlett-Packard, which has also offered Linux-powered computers.

In February, Michael Dell, the group’s founder, resumed his position as chief executive of the company, replacing Kevin Rollins. The move came amid criticism that Dell had concentrated too much on its supply chain at the expense of customer service and listening to what consumers want.

The decision to return to Linux in response to consumer demand marks a u-turn for Dell, which first offered the open source system in 1999 but withdrew it two years later, citing insufficient demand.

Dell has not given any pricing details on its Linux products, or how they would compare to Windows PCs.

Consumers who buy Linux machines from Dell will have the option to buy support services from Canonical, a company that has sponsored Ubuntu.

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Topics:
linux ,dell ,iot ,open source

Published at DZone with permission of Anna Morris. See the original article here.

Opinions expressed by DZone contributors are their own.

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